Ramage Family History

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1  Cameron, Samuel (I895)
 
2
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Description: Marriage
27 May 1901 ? Age: 27
Vancouver, Clark, Washington, United States
WA Digital Archives Marriage Return #1030 SE Fletcher of San Francisco, CA-born Boston, Mass; Salesman; JE Fletcher and Fanny K?ck (Kendrick?) Sadie E Ramage of Portland, OR-born Minn father: J H Ramage & (mother maiden name) Curtis Married 27 May 1901 in Vancouver WA 
Ramage, Sarah "Sadie" E (I1386)
 
3
Residence: 1856 Lake Prairie, Iowa
Residence: 1850 Keokuk, Iowa
Residence: 1860 Clay, Marion, Iowa 
Coy, Eleanor (I4703)
 
4
Inscription:
USA WWI

HACK, FRED L
PVT US ARMY
WORLD WAR I
DATE OF BIRTH: 11/02/1877
DATE OF DEATH: 10/11/1956
BURIED AT: SECTION P SITE 1175
FT. ROSECRANS NATIONAL CEMETERY
P.O. BOX 6237 SAN DIEGO, CA 92166
(619) 553-2084 
Hack, Frederic Lee (I3707)
 
5 Lt Samuel Rice King was born on 14 October 1667 at Marlborough, MA; under the name Rice.1,3,5 He was the son of Samuel Rice and Elizabeth King. Lt Samuel Rice King married Abigail Clapp, daughter of Ezra Clapp and Abigail Pond, on 30 October 1693 at Milton, MA; listed as Samuel of Sudbury and Abigail of Milton.1,2,3,6,7 Lt Samuel Rice King died on 4 March 1713 at Sudbury, MA.8,9,10
He was also known as Samuel Rice.8,2,4 There is uncertainty about the parents of Sarah King (q.v.). LDS records list her parents both as Thomas King and Elizabeth Clapp of Charlemont (q.v.) and as Samuel Rice King and Abigail Clapp of Sudbury. The published vital records of Charlemont, Milton, Scituate, and Sudbury are silent about the birth of a Sarah King. The baptismal records for Sudbury begin in November 1706. We know from the published vital records of Milton and Sudbury that Samuel King alias Rice was married at Milton and lived at Sudbury. Based on proximity, Samuel and Abigail would seem more plausible than Thomas and Elizabeth to be Sarah King's parents. However, neither claim can be substantiated. Indeed, both Samuel and Abigail died rather suddenly in 1713, and their family dispersed. He was adopted when an infant, was given by his father to his "brother and sister King" for their own. His mother had died when he was about two weeks old. He was adopted by Peter King and Sarah (Rice) and known on Sudbury records as "Samuel King, alias Rice" Y-DBA tests in the year 2004 for descendants of Samuel Rice King prove that he was an Edmund Rice descendant.8 
Rice, Samuel (I434)
 
6 Samuel Rice was baptized on 12 November 1634 at Berkhamstead, co Hertfordshire, England.3,2,4 He was the son of Deacon Edmund Rice and Thomasine Frost. Samuel Rice married Elizabeth King, daughter of Deacon Thomas King and Anne Collins, on 8 November 1655 at Sudbury, MA.5,2,6 Samuel Rice married Mary Dix, daughter of Edward Dix and Jane Wilkerson, in September 1668 at Sudbury, MA; (not found in the published records).7,2 Samuel Rice married Sarah White, daughter of John White and Joane West, on 13 December 1676 at Concord, MA.2,8,9 Samuel Rice died on 25 February 1684/85 at Marlborough, MA; (literally 1684).10,11 He estate was probated on 7 April 1685 at Middlesex County, MA.7,12
The births of all three children of Samuel and Mary Rice are also entered in the Marlborough vital records under Samuel and his first wife Elizabeth.11 Samuel Rice's second wife is entered in the Marlborough VR as having died 18 June 1678. Therefore, either that death date or this marriage date is undoubtedly wrong. Your authors believe the marriage date to be correct. He and Elizabeth King resided circa 1661 at Marlborough, MA.13 In testimony of court files at Cambridge, MA on 2 May 1666, Samuel Rice stated that he was 32 years old.5 Samuel Rice and Mary Dix retired during the King Phillip's War in 1675 at Concord, MA.14 Samuel Rice left a will on 10 February 1684 at Marlborough, MA,, mentioning wife Sarah; sons Joshua and Edmund; daughters Elizabeth Haynes, Hannah Hubbard, and Esther Hubbard; 'my son Samuel Rice, whom I have given to brother and sister King for their own'; sons Edward and Joseph; and two daughters Mary and Abigail Rice, under 18. Brothers Edward and Joseph Rice were named overseers.7 Inventory ?349.2.6.7 
Rice, Samuel (I426)
 
7 * BIRTH: 14 MAY 1696, Marlborough, Middlesex Co, MA
Marlborough Vital Records
* DEATH: ABT 1756, Shrewsbury, Worcester Co, MA
Worcester County, MA, Probate Records, Samuel Wheelock, case 63804, recorded 1756. 
Wheelock, Samuel (I2957)
 
8 C John Cameron, U.E. Loyalist- Born 1725, Clunes, Lochaber (near Fort William), Scotland. According to Dr. George Cameron (15 Dec 1987), 417 Pitt St., Cornwall, Ont: "John (C) and his brothers Alexander (Sandy) and Donald took part in the battle of Culloden (16 Apr 1746). John's brother Allan had been killed at the battle of Prestonpans on 21 Sep 1745. Sandy and Donald were killed at Culloden, but John escaped. Married Mary Cameron (a distant cousin), when? Rannoch Church, Scotland. The family emigrated to the Mohawk Valley in New York State in the autumn of 1773 on the ship "H.M.S. Pearl". The family settled as tenants on the estates of Sir William Johnson near Johnstown, Tryon County, N.Y (in the Mohawk Valley). As John and his son Alexander (C-1) fought for the Crown during the American Revolution in 1776, the family was expelled from the Mohawk Valley. John never served as a soldier, but he assisted scouting parties and procured intelligence. Those persons who were loyal to
the Crown during the American Revolution (United Empire Loyalists) were given 200 acres of land free in Canada. Also the sons and daughters of these Loyalists were also given 200 acres of free land. John came to Canada in 1783.
There is a record of a Land Grant- Lot 6, Conc 4, Cornwall Twp, Stormont County, 200 acres to Alexander Cameron and John Cameron (son and father), registered 16 Nov 1797 (Patent: 27 May 1797). John had the west half of Lot 6
and Alexander the east half. John died 10 May 1824, Lot 6, Conc 4, Cornwall Township, Stormont County. Buried on the farm (Cameron Cemetery). Inscription on John's tombstone: "John Cameron, Clunes, U.E.L., died May 10 1824, aged 99 years. Also his wife Mary Cameron, died 3 Nov 1830, aged 91 years." Description of Cameron Cemetery by Alex W. Fraser (March 1986) of Lancaster, Ontario: "It isn't easy to find. The half-acre cemetery on Frank Cameron's farm, located on North McConnell Ave. (Cameron Road) is a long way from a main road and any means of transportation. One must set out on foot after a half mile ride up Frank Cameron's lane to a
set of buildings. You walk through the site of an old stone quarry. The remains of a metal fence (that kept cattle away from the cemetery) are on a small grassy mound, surrounded by a cornfield." (Cornwall Registry Office, Duncan MacDonald, J. M., Alex W. Fraser, Dr. George Cameron)

C* Mary (Cameron) Cameron- Born 1739, Glen Nevis (near Fort William), Scotland. Father- Alexander Cameron, of Glen Nevis, was a peer under the Jacobite regime (entitled to "Lord Alexander"). Mother- Mary Cameron. Mary (C*) has been referred to as "Lady Mary Cameron". "These peerages were conferred on various Highland Chieftans by the Jacobite kings, but were all abolished after the Battle of Culloden in 1746." The following story was told, in 1924, by Rev. Robert Cameron to his cousin Jane Withers :
"Sophia's grandmother was known as Lady Mary (C*) of Glen Nevis. She was a wealthy heiress. Her family opposed her marriage to her cousin John Cameron (C) who was a poor young accountant and had been rejected for army service because he was not tall enough. Mary slipped out the window and married him anyway in spite of her family's opposition. They lived happily for several years in her home. All their children were born there except the last two who were born after they left Scotland and came to New York." (Note:
Susan, was born in Cornwall Twp. Grace, and John, , were born in Johnstown, N.Y. Christy's,, birth date needs to be checked.)
Mary died 3 Nov 1830, Lot 6, Conc 4, Cornwall Twp, Stormont County. Buried on the farm (Cameron Cemetery).
(Duncan MacDonald, June MacIntosh)
 
Cameron, Lady Mary (Of Glen Nevis) (I1070)
 
9 Comfort 4 BIGELOW, fifth child, third daughter of John 3 ( Samuel 2, John 1), and Jerusha (GARFIELD) BIGELOW, was born 23 Sept 1707 in Marlborough, Middlesex co, MA. She was married on 26 Aug 1728 to Joseph BRIGHAM (his first wife), son of Gershom and Mehitable BRIGHAM of Marlborough. He was born 21 Apr 1706. She died 1750 in Marlborough, and he married (2) 1751 Mrs. Ruth (RICE) WARD, widow of Elisha WARD. Joseph BRIGHAM was 3 years a Selectman.
Children of Joseph and Comfort (Bigelow) Brigham, all born Marlborough:

15151 Mehetabel, b 14 July 1729; d ____ ; m 1749 Samuel JONES; they moved to Berlin, MA after the birth of one daughter:
a. Mehetabel -- and no further info..
b. Samuel (1725-1797)

15152 Sarah, b 13 May 1731; d ___ ; m 1755 Benjamin TAINTER, and res Shrewsbury.

15153 Lavinia, b 10 July 1733; d Aug 1784; m 12 Apr 1757 Thaddeus Howe of Marlborough, who d 19 Mar 1799 (age 66); he m (2) Mrs. Prudence HOLOMON of Bolton. Children of Lavinia:
a. Susanna, b 12 June 1758; m Gershom RICE.
b. Nanne, b 15 Feb 1760; m Jonas MORSE.
c. Jonah, b 22 Feb 1762; m Betty CRANSTON.
d. William, b 4 Dec 1764; m Elizabeth STOW.
e. Lovina, b 23 Mar 1767; m Moses Sherman.
f. Aaron, b 15 May 1770; m Sarah DANA; res Lunenburg, VT.
g. Martha, b 5 Feb 1773; m Francis BARNARD.
h. Stephen, b 10 Aug 1776.

15154 Joseph, b 14 June 1735; d 17 July 1743.

15155 Comfort, b 29 July 1737; d 17 July 1742.

15156 Martha, b 9 Sept 1739; m 20 July 1763 Daniel BARNES jr, son of Daniel and Jeruiah (EAGER) BARNES, and had:
a. John, b 6 Nov 1763; m Sarah HOWE.
b. Martha, b 9 May 1766; m Fortunatus BRIGHAM.

15157 Stephen, b 15 Oct 1741; m 1764 Jemima SNOW; said to res Boylston.

15158 Joseph, b 27 Sept 1743; m 11 Mar 1766 Lydia BARNES; res Marlborough.

15159 Comfort, b 26 Aug 1745; d 19 May 1771; m 14 Mar 1770 Daniel STEVENS, had:
a. Samuel, b 21 Feb 1771.

1515A Jonah, b 19 Nov 1747; d 1 Dec 1827; m 1771 Sarah WALKER; no issue.

Sources:
Howe, Bigelow Family of America;
Bigelow Family Genealogy, Vol I page 48-49;
Note from cousin:
Jerusha GARFIELD's mother has this link from Robert's work: Sarah GALE
I have been working on linking up some of my WARD, BRIGHAM and RICE connections the past few days. In linking up our Joseph BRIGHAM born 1706 to his great grandfather, Thomas BRIGHAM, I came across some interesting other links. Before he married Ruth RICE, she had been married to Elisha WARD, and that he had been married to Comfort BIGELOW.
Looking for verification of these facts I opened your site, among others, again and added Comfort's data along with that of her parents.
Robert Kline email: robertkline@bc.sympatico.ca
1079 Walalee Dr, Phone: 604-657-0134
Delta, BC, Canada, V4M 2L9
Web page: http://www3.bc.sympatico.ca/robertkline/
Rod Bigelow

8 Prospect Circle
Massena, N.Y. 13662 
Bigelow, Comfort (I3811)
 
10 George Michael Troutner served in Captain Benjamin Weiser's Company of the Northumberland Militia in the Revolutionary War. He arrived in Wilmington on the ship Recovery. on 23 October 1754 Troutner, George Michael (I4565)
 
11 He died in 1790 in Wilkes County North Carolina. He signed a will in Wilkes County Will Book I page 277. Last Will and Testament of Joshua Mize Dec July Term 1790 :

In the name of God Amen. I , Joshua Mize of Wilkes County in the State of North Carolina Farmer. being thro the Abundant Mercy and goodness of God tho weak in Body; Yet of a sound and perfect understanding and Memory do Constitute this my Last Will and Testament and desire it may be recv'd by all as such - -First i most Humbly Bequeth my Soul to God my Maker Beseeching his most Gracious Acceptance of it through the all Sufficient Merits and Meditation of my (most) compassionate Redeemer Jesus Christ.
First I will that all my Debts and Funeral Charges be paid and as to the Wordly Estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me with I leave in Manner and form Following - - i give unto my son Isaac Mize,Benjamin Mize,Jeremiah Mize,John Mize and to my Daughters Elizabeth Taylor, Eddy Chambers, Keziah Chambers, Nancy Brown and Polly Roberts five schillings to each to be paid by my beloved wife out of my Estate Either in Money or in something to the value therof at her Discreation also I give unto my Daughter Luddie Mize my Gray Mare and Red Cow named Cherry likewise I give unto her my Daughter lyddia Mize a Feather Bed and Furniture and as to the rest of my Estate I give and Leave unto my Beloved Wife Patty Mize During her Natural Life all my goods and Chattels Lands and Tenements both Real and Personal and after my said wife Patty Mize Deceased II Desire that it may be eequally Divided among my children Viz. Isaac Mize,Benjamin Mize,Jeremiah Mize,John Mize,Elizabeth Taylor,Eddy Chambers,Keziah Chambers,Nancy Brown,Polly Roberts and Lydia Mize and Lastly I do make and Constitute Patty Mize my said Wife Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament. Dated this Sixteenth day of March in the Year of our Lord 1790. 
Mize, Joshua (I1095)
 
12 " My father, Fred Lee Hack, was an entirely different sort of person— an extrovert like his father. J. B. (James Bluford) Hack (Grandpa) was quite an important person in that small part of the state in those days. Trying to follow in his footsteps could have been a bit rough. Physically, my father was about 5'10", auburn curly hair (till he lost it at an early age) light brown eyes, very erect carriage (he was forever smacking us kids on the back, "sit/stand straight and carry your head proud"). About 1906 (or 7) Grandpa sent him to veterinary college in Kansas City, MO. Grandpa had been a veterinarian for many years— no license or education beyond the 8th grade— also an auctioneer.

Those years for us were pretty "lean" putting Papa through college. (I won't elaborate but you'd be surprised with what you could do without)." From Irene Hack
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Fred Lee Hack appeared on the census of 19 June 1900 at S.D.10; E.D.130; Sheet 14 A, Spring Creek Township, Pike County, Illinois; is age 22, has been married 2 years to Mide, and Fred is farming. They have had 2 children, only 1 is living. He appeared on the census of 15 April 1910 at S.D.11; E.D.144; Sheet 1 A, Spring Creek - Nebo Village, Pike County, Illinois; is age 32, married to Almira and Fred is working as a Veterinarian. They have had 4 children, all living. All their children and nephew, Carson Main, are with them. He appeared on the census of 3 January 1920 at S.D.2; E.D.243; Sheet2 B, Filer Village, Twin Falls County, Idaho; is age 43, married to Mide and he is farming. Four children, Fred's brother Frank and a nephew Byron are with them. He appeared on the census of 3 April 1930 at E.D.27-12; S.D.6; Sheet 2 A, Jerome, Jerome County, Idaho; is age 52, married to Mide and he is working as a sheep herder.
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Frederick L. HACK was born in 1878 in of Spr. Crk. twp, Pike, Illinois.

Source: Personal knowledge and records of Louise Weeks, Jan 1992

Source: from research of Brian L. Taylor, Farr West, UT.

Source: 1880 Census, FHL film 1254243.

Marriage year from 1900 Census, FHL film 1374331.

On picture of Fred L. Hack : "Fred L. Hack Graduation picture from Veternary College, Kansas City"

1890 Census Spring Creek, Pike, Illinois
Name: Fred Hack
Home in 1900: Spring Creek, Pike, Illinois
Age: 22
Birth Date: Nov 1877
Birthplace: Illinois
Race: White
Ethnicity: American
Relationship to head-of-house: Head
Father's Birthplace: Kentucky
Mother's Birthplace: Illinois
Spouse's Name: Mide
Marriage Year: 1898
Marital Status: Married
Years Married: 2
Residence : Nebo Village, Pike, Illinois
Household Members: Name Age
Fred Hack 22
Mide Hack 21
Irene Hack 1 
Hack, Frederic Lee (I3707)
 
13 " My mother, Almira Main (Mide she was always called) was a rather small woman, had just black straight hair (which wasn't fashionable in those days) dark eyes, olive skin and beautiful white teeth. All her family seems to have those perfect teeth. When I was a child she was ill or as they used to say, " ailin' " frequently. Having children was a real ordeal for her. She had five of us and several miscarriages although I never knew what was wrong at the time. When I was about seven or eight I can recall vividly when they thought she wouldn't make it. There wasn't a hospital in miles and miles. Our faithful family doctor came and stayed at our house, right by her bedside and she lived.

As to talents— she could sew beautifully and she did have a great talent for loving and giving of herself and her time to anyone who had a sad story to tell. I can't really remember her faults unless not standing up for her rights would be called that. She didn't crack down on us kids very hard and I'm sure we needed it. Dad was away from home a lot. She'd give us a swat on the rear now and then and sometimes send us out to get a switch so she could switch our legs if we had been really ornery. Then she'd usually say, "Now if you promise not to do that again I'll not use the switch this time." We— Kit and I— got onto the fact that if we brought a real heavy stick, Mom would be so horrified at the thought of using it, we'd usually get off scott-free. (She should have put us in the rain barrel and held us down for the long count of ten.)

My first year in school, Kit and I walked a mile or so to school. One day in early fall we found our house had burned to the ground. No fire department, no running water just neighbors with buckets. Water dipped from a nearby creek. Mom had got out with Logan— all our family pictures, mementos, everything just ashes.

From there we went to Nebo (into town) again. Grandpa Hack, out of the goodness of his heart, bought us (among other things) an entire bolt of calico. Out of this Mom made dresses for herself and Ima and I. Curtains, bed spreads, shirts for Pop and Logan and Kit, stool covers, doilies, you name it we had it. That green background with tiny yellow flowers I'll never forget. Today, no doubt, it would be classic." Source: Irene Hack
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Jerome Cemetery records list her as :HACK, MIDA ELMIRA, b.1878, d.1934, Bur. 12-4-1934, Sp: FRED L., Age 56 yr., Grave: 1-3-48 
Main, Mida Almira (I3709)
 
14 " Ramage, John. Arrived Quebec on the Prompt, 8 July 1817. Loc 20 Aug 1817, Lot 16SW, Con 2, Beckwith Twp, Lanark Co. Ontario. Moved to Edwardsburg Twp, Grenville County before 1820. CLP420" Source: A Dictionary of Scottish Emigrants to Canada before Confederation Vol. 2 by Donald Whyte R 929.371 W623D

Note: CLP = Upper Canada Land Petitions: Perth Military Settlement, 24

Lanark County (also known as the "underwater Township") is still very much uninhabited in 1879 and in fact only can boast 5000 full time residents in 1997. John stays only 2 years before joining William in Edwardburg Twp.

Photo of silver spoons created by John Ramage Canadian, active Kingston, Ontario 1851-1869 :Teaspoons c. 1860, silver, Gift of the Henry Birks Collection of Canadian Silver, 1979 in the National Gallery of Canada (no. 26249.1-6)


1857 Living in Kingston, Frontenac as a watchmaker, silversmith on 63 Brock Street
source: Directory of the Province of Ontario, 1857, Directory, Page 489
TitleParish registers for Lasswade, 1617-1855
AuthorsChurch of Scotland. Parish Church of Lasswade (Midlothian) (Main Author)
NotesMicrofilm of original records (Books 691 ; vols. 1-7.) in the New Register House, Edinburgh. 
Ramage, John (I39)
 
15 ""developmentally disabled", as they would say today, as a result of a childhood illness.": Gib Ramage Hayes, Robert E (I3250)
 
16 "(Rev.) Humphrey Fenn (Humphrey) was born on 26 April 1552, according to his will, . . . the location undoubtedly Wiggenhall St. German's, Norfolk. Brief details of his life, and his activities and trials as a Puritan activist, have been in earlier articles. With his spending time imprisoned and being denied privileges afforded conforming pastors, one would expect that he may have died poor. Such was far from the case. Though missing is the part of his will that would have revealed his desires concerning his worldly goods, the inventory survives. Dated 11 February 1633/4, it lists in detail the contents of the house where he lived, and it has the itens he owned in two other houses that he rented out. His own house had nine rooms. The other two houses had seven and nine rooms respectively; he owned furniture in these but not other household goods. The list of contents of one of his rooms, 'the Studie Chamber,' is helpful in understanding Humphrey's interests:
'4 Pictures in cullord [cupboard?]
One foulding table. 8 square. one deske.
one glasse case, one close stoole, one
boxe wch the Evidences are in, & 2 smale boxes
His bookes in the same chamber
80 little pictures. 36 mappes. & other
paper pictures.' " 1431

"Humphrey Fenn was a graduate of Cambridge University and a minister with strong Puritan leanings. In 1999 the editors prepared an enlightening follow-up article, 'The Will of Humphrey Fenn of Coventry, co. Warwick, England.' Before his death in 1634, Fenn wrote a will in two parts. The preface, called The Profession of the Faith of Humfrey Fen, is a long diatribe against the practices of the Church of England; it was printed in 1641. The 1999 TAG article contains the printed text. The second part of Fenn's will was apparently about the bequeathal of his property, but because of his ire against the established church, church officials refused to enter a copy of it into the regular books. The 1999 article contains the full text of the printed preface, along with a note that an earlier author cited the original document as P.R.O. S.P. [i.e., Public Record office, State Papers] 16/260/83. Perhaps this was the entire will. Simon Neal, researcher in England, procured a photocopy of the original from the Public Record Office.
Examination of the copy brought disappointment. It is only 'The prefacy to old Mr Fenns Will,' not the full document. A closer look, however, shows that it has some important differences from the printed version. It was received on 21 Februar 1633/4 '[f]rom my L[or]d B[isho]p of Coventry and Lichfield.' " 1431

"Humphrey fenn wrote his will in his own hand, without paragraphing. A note in the upper left corner of the first page states: 'Aged 79 yrs 26 Aprill A' 1631.' About two-thirds through the published version (in what was printed as paragraph beginning 'This confession I set downe. . . ') appears 'mine age, which is eighty seven yeares.' The original here has no numbers spelled out. Whatever number was first written is crossed out, and the number 79 is written above it.
Near the beginning, in the printed version, is 'I have been Preacher fifty and five years.' AGain, the original here has no numbers spelled out. The sentence reads, 'I have been a Preachr for 53 yrs.' The issue is confused, however, by a statement about halfway through the document where the printed version has "I my selfe for the space fo fifty yeares [preached].' The original has a two-digit number here, as in the other places, and the first of the two digits has been written over. The seconf number is definitely 0; the first looks to be a 4 or 5.
The printed document ends with 'against all gain-sayers.' The original ends: 'against all gainesayers. An 1631. By me Hu'f: Fen.' " 1431

"Humphrey Fenn, an educated man, probably knew when he was born; thus the present article assigns him the date he designated, 26 April 1552. This coincides well with what has been learned from other records." 1431

"Assuming that he came from a family for whom chances were good of finding wills that disposed of property, and seeking a clue as to where the family lived, I checked the Prerogative Court of Canterbury will indexes for ideas about locations. The will of a Humfrey Fenne of Old Windsor, Berks, was proved in 1602. It was read, as well as the will discovered to be that of his father, Thomas Fenne, proved in 1591, one of the 'yeomen of her Maiesties Chaumber, Old Windsor, Berks.; [and] Stradbrooke, Suffolk. [PCC 3 Harrington [FHL film #91,984]. Both of these wills were executed in the lifetime of the Rev. Humphrey, but the testators seemd not related to him. These and other wills, however, indicated that an original areas of Fenns was Suffolk. No Humphreys were listed in the many Fenn wills in the Suffolk indexes. The two archdeaconry courts in Suffolk were under the jurisdiction of the Consistory Court of Norwich, which was next consulted. Here, excitingly, was a Humphrey in 1568 [Consistory Court of Norwich 44 Ponder [FHL film #94,904]. And reading revealed that he was the man being sought, father of the university student and staunch Puritan divine." 1431

"Young Humphrey started his studies at Cambridge on 12 November 1568, when he was 16 years of age. His father's will is dated 26 November 1568. Imagination suggests that his father accompanied this eldest son the forty or so miles south, over the fens (marshy areas), for his entrance to the world of vast knowledge available at the school. Upon father Humphrey's arrival back home, in Wiggenhall St. German's, Norfolk, he likely became concerned that he should make sure young Humphrey would be financially able to stay at Cambridge, and he wrote his will 'withe myne owne hande.' Or maybe his health was already poor, and someone else took young Humphrey to the university. In his will, he mentioned 'this the tyme of my sycknes,' but the illness could have come after son Humphrey's departure. Father Humphrey allowed £60 for his son's education. He detailed it as follows [spelling changed to present usage': 'I will that the said sixty pounds given to the said Jumfry my son shall be paid or bestowed upon him in manner and form following, that is to say ten pounds yearly by the space of six years next after my decesase if the said Hy[m]fry my son shall continue in learning in the university during the said ears; and if he shall depart from learning in the university, before the said six years be expired, then I will the reisdue or so much of the said legacy of sixty pounds to him before given as shall be then unbestowed upon the said Humfrye at his said departure shall be detained, and kept from thenceforth to his use in the hands of my executor until he shall attain and come to his full age of twenty-one years.' " 1431

"Son Humphrey continued at Cambridge, graduated, and eventually became pastor of one of the large parishes in the faraway city of Coventry, Warwickshire." 1431

"Fenn, Humphrey. Matric. sizar from Queens', Michs. 1568; B.A. 1572-3; M.A. from Peterhouse, 1576. V. of Holy Trinity, Coventry, 1578. Suffered suspension and imprisonment as a puritan. Returned to Coventry, 1592. Appointed lecturer at St. John the Baptist's, 1624. Buried Feb. 8, 1634, in Holy Trinity Churchyard, Coventry. (Cooper, II. 150; D.N.B.)" 1432

"Fenn, Humphrey (1543/4– 1634), Church of England clergyman, matriculated as a sizar from Queens' College, Cambridge, on 12 November 1568, and graduated BA in 1573. Nothing is known of his background, which was probably comparatively humble. Having moved to Peterhouse, he proceeded MA in 1576 and began his ministry in Northampton in the same year, immediately establishing a nonconformist reputation. He was imprisoned and, although the inhabitants petitioned the queen on his behalf attesting to the quality of his preaching, it seems that he did not return to the town on his release.

On 21 February 1578 Fenn succeeded Anthony Fletcher as vicar of Holy Trinity, Coventry. By this time he was married, a daughter being baptized at Holy Trinity in July 1578; nothing certain is known of his wife. In Coventry he became associated with Thomas Cartwright (1535– 1603) and the growing presbyterian movement. A classis was established in Warwickshire around 1583, headed by Cartwright and Fenn, both of whom enjoyed the patronage of the earl of Leicester. At the request of the London puritans he accompanied the earl to represent their grievances to the queen. When Whitgift's three articles were issued in 1583 he refused to subscribe and was suspended. An account of his examination from a manuscript of Roger Morrice (c.1628– 1702) was included by Benjamin Brook in his Lives of the Puritans (1831). Fenn was replaced in Coventry by a Welshman called Griffen, but was restored to his vicarage shortly after 14 July 1585 through the intercession of Leicester. In the same year he accompanied the earl to the Netherlands as a chaplain.

In 1590 Fenn was again suspended, as a result of his active participation in the Warwickshire classis and his support for the puritan Book of Discipline, to which he, Cartwright, and ten other ministers in the county had subscribed in 1588. He was committed to the Fleet prison and, refusing to take the oath ex officio, was imprisoned for contempt and deprived of his living. His successor, Richard Eaton, was instituted on 12 January 1591. In May that year the attorney-general exhibited a bill against Cartwright, Fenn, and seven others in Star Chamber, and on 13 May they made their first appearance before the court. The defendants denied that in their 'associations' they exercised any jurisdiction or meddled with sedition— a defence which Fenn steadfastly maintained. They were remanded without bail, although James VI of Scotland interceded (12 June) for their release. By December 1591 the case against them had reached stalemate and they petitioned for their release on bail. A further petition in April 1592 was successful. By the autumn Fenn had returned to Warwickshire and was petitioning to be allowed to preach.

It is not certain that Fenn and his co-defendants were ever completely cleared of the charges against them and the extent to which he was subsequently able to resume his ministry is unclear. He was not restored to the vicarage of Holy Trinity, but Julines Herring (1582– 1644) studied divinity with Fenn after leaving Cambridge and he appeared on one list of proposed representatives for the 1604 Hampton Court conference. The Humphrey Fenn appointed to the Sunday lectureship at St John the Baptist, Bablake, Coventry, on 24 April 1624 was his son, an Oxford MA born in 1582. In 1626 or soon after 'old Mr. Fenn' joined with the mayor and leading citizens in inviting Samuel Clarke (1599– 1683), the martyrologist, to become a lecturer at Coventry (Lives, 5– 6).

Fenn's will, written in 1631 when he was eighty-seven and had been a preacher for fifty-five years, was prefaced by a profession of his faith declaring that the Church of England maintained 'a shameful schism against all the reformed churches of the gospel' and endorsing a presbyterian system of governance for the church. He died in Coventry early in 1634 and was buried there on 8 February in Holy Trinity churchyard. A fortnight later Archbishop William Laud received from the bishop of Coventry and Lichfield a copy of the controversial preface, which also circulated in manuscript among the godly before its publication as The Last Will and Testament with the Profession of Faith of Humphrey Fenn (1641). Fenn's wife apparently predeceased him; she may be the Anne Fenn buried at Holy Trinity on 27 January 1631. His probate inventory shows that he died a comparatively wealthy man.

Jan Broadway"1433

"Fenn, Humphrey (d 1634), puritan divine, was matriculated as sizar of Queens' College, Cambridge, on 12 Nov. 1568, and graduated B.A. in 1573. He migrated to Peterhouse, and graduated M.A. in 1576. In the same year he began his ministry at Northampton, and at once got into trouble for his nonconformity, and was committed to gaol. The inhabitants of Northampton petitioned Queen Elizabeth for his release, giving him a high character as a preacher and a loyal subject.

On 21 Feb. 1578 he succeeded Anthony Fletcher as vicar of Holy Trinity, Coventry, and became a prominent man in the party headed by Thomas Cartwright (1535– 1603) [q.v.] . At the request of the London puritans he accompanied the Earl of Leicester to represent their grievances to the queen. On the issue of Whitgift's three articles (1583), he refused to subscribe. He was cited to Lambeth (1584), and suspended. An account of his examination is given by Brook, from Roger Morrice's manuscript. His place was taken by 'one Griffen, a Welchman,' between whom and Fenn, according to the manuscript city annals, there was 'a great contention' for the vicarage in 1584 or 1585. Fenn was restored to his vicarage shortly after 14 July 1585, through the intercession of Leicester. But in 1590 he was again suspended, owing to the active part which he took in the 'associations' of the Warwickshire puritan divines, was committed to the Fleet by the high commission, with Cartwright and others, and, refusing the purgation by oath, was deprived. His successor, Richard Eaton, was instituted on 12 Jan. 1591. On 13 May Fenn and his companions were brought before the Star-chamber. Articles, dealing mainly with their 'book of discipline,' were exhibited against them. They denied that in their 'associations' they exercised any jurisdiction, or meddled with sedition. Fenn 'seemed more stiff than Cartwright.' The Star-chamber remanded them without bail. James VI of Scotland interceded (12 June) for their release; on 4 Dec. they petitioned for bail; Fenn's signature stands second in the list, immediately after Cartwright's. In April 1592 they again petitioned for release, this time successfully. (Leicester's letter of thanks is dated 21 May.)

Fenn returned to Coventry, and resumed his ministry, probably preaching only on week-days. On 24 April 1624 'Mr. Humphrey Fenn, preacher,' was appointed to the Sunday lectureship at St. John the Baptist's (Bablake). This was a new lectureship; the church, which had been in ruins, was repaired in 1608, and a week-day lectureship established in favour of John Oxenbridge. In 1626 or soon after 'old Mr. Fenn' joined with the mayor and leading citizens in inviting Samuel Clarke (1599– 1683) [q.v.] , the martyrologist, to become a lecturer at Coventry. This is the last notice of Fenn. Tong says that he 'spent above forty years' with the Coventry people; we must correct this to 'above fifty,' even if we deduct his enforced absences. He died early in 1633– 4, and was buried on 8 Feb. in Holy Trinity churchyard, Coventry. He seems to have had a son and grandson of the same name.

His will, made in 1631, was prefaced by 'so full and so open a protestation against the hierarchy and the ceremonies, that the prelatical party would not suffer it to be put among the records of the court when the will was tendred to be proved' (CLARKE, in Life of Julines Herring). On 21 Feb. 1634 a copy of the introduction to the will of 'Humphrey Fen the eldest' was received by Archbishop Laud from the bishop of Coventry and Lichfield. This preamble (only) was printed as 'The Last Will and Testament with the Profession of Faith of Humphrey Fenn,' &c., 1641, sm. 8vo (no place of printing).
Sources

Fenn's Last Will; Clarke's Lives of Thirty-two Engl. Divines, 1677, p. 190; Clarke's Autobiography, prefixed to Lives, 1683, p. 5; Tong's Dedication of Warren's Funeral Sermon for Joshua Merrell, 1716; Brook's Lives of the Puritans, 1813, i. 444 sq., ii. 151 sq.; Strype's Whitgift, 1822, i. 429, ii. 13, 81 sq., iii. 242 sq.; Annals, 1824, iv. 66, 103; Neal's Hist. of the Puritans (Toulmin), 1822, iii. 415 sq., v. App. p. xxvii; Sibree and Caston's Indep. in Warwickshire, 1855, p. 16 sq. (makes his son the lecturer at St. John's); Cooper's Athenæ Cantabr., 1861, ii. 150, 546; Cal. State Papers, Dom. (1634), p. 468; Parish Magazine, Trinity, Coventry, 1881 (July); extract from burial register, per the Rev. F. M. Beaumont.
A. G.

Original date of publication: 1888" 1434

"Here he [Master Julines Herring] had fpecial encouragements in the Ftudy of Divinity, from Mafter Humphrey Fen, famous for his Miniftry and non-conformity at Coventry, (who in the Preface to his laft Will and Teftament, made fo full and fo open a Proteftation againft the Hierarchy and Ceremonies that the Prelatical Party would not fuffer it to be put among the Records of the Court when the Will was tendred to be proved) . . . " 1435

"In Iuly the next yeare, vz. 1584, some of the Scottish ministers afore spoken of, wnet tot he Act in Oxford . . . 'Here haue beene a good company of godly brethren this Act. Maister Fen, Wilcox, Axton: The Scottish ministers and wee, haue had some meeting and conference, to our great comfort that are here." 1436

"There was in the same Assembly a great approbation obtained of the foresaid booke of Discipline, as to be a draught of discipline essentiall and necessarie for all times, and certaine articles .. . were then brought forward, treated of and subscribed unto (as Maister Nutter and Maister Cleuely, two that wer then present haue deposed) by Maister Cartwright, Maister Fenne, Maister Wight, who promised to guide themselves by the saide Discipline and according to it, as it is set downe in the said articles" 1436

"I receiued a letter [Fen to Field] from you in the name of the reft of the brethren: whereby I underftande you ioyninge to gether in choyfc of my felfe, unto the feruice of the Church, under the Earle of Leicefter &c. I am ready to runne, if the Church command me, according to the holy decrees and orders of the Difcipline, &c. the Lord lefus increafe your meetinges with a doublt portion of grace: euen fuch as by you from our head may diftill down to vs, further rcmoued from fo worthy & notable meanes."
===============================
FENN, HUMPHREY (d. 1634), puritan divine, was matriculated as sizar of Queens' College, Cambridge, on 12 Nov. 1568, and graduated B.A. in 1573. He migrated to Peterhouse, and graduated M.A. in 1576. In the same year be began bis ministry at Northampton, and at once got into trouble for his nonconformity, and was committed to gaol. The inhabitants of Northampton petitioned Queen Elizabeth for his release, giving him a high character as a preacher and a loyal subject.
On 21 Feb. 1578 he succeeded Anthony Fletcher as vicar of Holy Trinity, Coventry, and became a prominent man in the party headed by Thomas Cartwright (1535-1003) [q. v.] At the request of the London puritans he accompanied the Earl of Leicester to represent their grievances to the queen. ()n the issue of Whitgift's three articles (1583), he refused to subscribe. He was cited to Lambeth (1581), and suspended. An account of his examination is given by Brook, from Roger Morrice's manuscript. His place was taken by 'one Grill'en, a Welehman,' between whom and Fenn, according to the manuscript city annals, there was 'a great contention' for the vicarage in 1584 or 1585. Fenn was restored to his vicarage short ly al ter 14 July 158"), through the intercession of Leicester. Hut in 15!K) he was again suspended, owing to the active part which he took in the 'associations'of the Warwickshire puritan divines, was committed to the
Fleet by the high commission, with Cartwright and others, and, refusing t he purgation by oath, was deprived. His successor, Richard Eaton, was instituted on 12 Jan. 1591. On 13 May Fenn and his companions were brought before the Star-chamber. Articles, deahng mainly with their 'book of discipline,' were exhibited against them. They denied that in their 'associations' they exercised any jurisdiction, or meddled with sedition. Fenn 'seemed more stiff than Cartwright.' The Star-chamber remanded them without bail. James VI of Scotland interceded (12 June) for their release; on 4 Dec. they petitioned for bail; Fenn's signature stands second in the list, immediately after Cartwright's. In April 1592 they again petitioned for release, this time successfully. (Leicester's letter of thanks is dated 21 May.)
Fenn returned to Coventry, and resumed his ministry, probably preachingonly on weekdays. On 24 April 1024 'Air. Humphrey Fenn, preacher,' was appointed to the Sunday lectureship at St. John the Baptist's (Bablake). This was a new lectureship; the church, which had been in ruins, was repaired in 1008, and a week-day lectureship established in favour of John Oxenbridge. In 1026 or soon after 'old Mr. Fenn' joined with the mayor and leading citizens in inviting Samuel Clarke (1599-1083) [q. v.], the martyrologist, to become a lecturer at Coventry. This is the last notice of Fenn. Tong says that he 'spent above forty years' with the Coventry people; we must correct this to ' above fifty,' even if we deduct his enforced absences. He died early in 1633-4, and was buried on 8 Feb. in Holy Trinity churchyard, Coventry. He seems to have had a son and grandson of the same name.
His will, made in 163], was prefaced by 'so full and so open a protestation against the hierarchy and the ceremonies, that the prelatical party would not suffer it to be put among the records of the court when the will was tendred to be proved' (clarke, in Life of Julines Herrinr/). On 21 Feb. 1634 a copy of the intn id net ion to the will of ' Humphrey Fen the eldest ' was received by Archbishop Laud from the bishop of Coventry and Lichfield. This preamble (only) was printed as 'The Last Will and Testament with the Profession of Faith of Humphrey Fenn,' &C, 1011, sm. 8vo (no place of printing).
| i'rim's Lust Will; Clarke's Lives of Thirtytwo Kngl. Divines, 1677, p. 190; Clarke'sAutobiograpliy, prefixed to Lives, 1683, p. o; Tong'sDedication of Warren's Funeral Sermon for Joshua Men-ell, 1716; Brook's Lives of the Puritans, 1813, i. 4 14 sq., ii. 151 sq.; Strvpe's Whitgift, 1822, i. 429, ii. 13, 81 sq., iii. 242 sq.; Annals,1824, iv. 66, 103; Neal's Hist, of the Puritans (Toulmin), 1822, iii. 415 sq., v. App. p. xxvii; Sibree and Caston's Indep. in Warwickshire, 1855, p. 16 sq. (makes his son the lecturer at St. John's); Cooper's Athenae Cantabr., 1861, ii. 150, 546; Cal. State Papers, Dom. (1634), p. 468; Parish Magazino.Trinity,Coventry, 1881 (July); extract from burial register, pur the Rev. F. M. Beaumont.] A. G.(source:Dictionary of national biography, Volume 18 edited by Sir Leslie Stephen, Sir Sidney Lee) 
Fenn, Humphrey (I4444)
 
17 "a hell roarer in his younger days but ended up retiring from the Naval shipyards in Bremerton": Gib Ramage

541-16-6429 
Hayes, Lawrence (I1377)
 
18 "At a ripe old age--John Colgan died at Four O'clock yesterday afternoon, August 24, at the home of John Gibson, two and a half miles from Salem on the Slough Road. Deceased was born August 15, 1810. He was a few days more than 95 years old. He was the father of James Colgan of the Capital Ice works. The funeral arrangements are not yet completed. They will be announced in tomorrow's paper." (Daily Oregon Statesman 25 August 1905. 4:3.)

(Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion County, Oregon, LOT 556 3SW S1/2) Inscription: John Colgan 1810 - 1905

Funeral arrangements were made by George H Colgan

Parkes Family Tree Updated: Fri Aug 16 2002 Contact: Steve Parkes

1 John CALGON
+ Elizabeth SAWYER
2 John H. CALGAN b: 1853
2 William B. CALGAN b: 1855
2 Robert CALGAN b: 1856
2 Nellie CALGAN b: 1858
+ Frank MORAN
2 Josephine CALGAN b: 1860
+ Fred ABBOTT
2 James CALGAN b: 1862
2 Mary CALGAN b: 1864
2 Edward CALGAN b: 1866
2 Harry CALGAN b: 1868 
Colgan, John (I3331)
 
19 "CLOE DIED IN TESTATE, BUT 9 CHILDREN ARE IDENTIFIED FROM BUTLER COUNTY COURT FILE 3191 (1888-1891)" FROM "PIONEER FAMILIES OF BUTLER COUNTY" BY AUSTIN AND ROUK, PAGE 415 Taylor, Chloe (I2409)
 
20 "George Young came into Scituate from Plymouth (probably) in 1660. He had a brother John of Plymouth born 1647, son of John. George ... settled east of Colman's hills on the margin of New Harbour marshes, where his descendants have lived until a late date."

Source: Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: immigrants to New England 1620-1633, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, 1995, Three volumes 
Young, George (I3109)
 
21 "Gist and Jarrett of Southside VA" - David Trimble
--------------------
SOURCES FOR THE JARRETT FAMILY
Nancy Beall 101 Rainbow Dr.,Livingsto, Texas, 77351. Vol15 Fam.1335 
Jarrett, Henry (I156)
 
22 "Gist and Jarrett of Southside VA" - David Trimble Jarrett, Thomas (I3276)
 
23 "Gist and Jarrett of Southside VA" - David Trimble Jarrett, Nicholas (I3278)
 
24 "GOODRICH, (Guttridge, Goodridge). Two of this name, JOHN and WILLIAM, brothers, were among the first settlers of Wethersfield Genealogies of their respective families (brief, as to John), are given in Goodwin's *Genealogical Notes*. Other contributions to the history of the family are

(1) The *Goodrich Family Memorial*, Parts 1 and 2, Compiled by Edwin Hubbard, Chicago, Ill., 1883-4, 8 vo. Mr. Hubbard d. 1890 and two parts only were pub. --- containing 109 pp.; and

(2) *The Goodrich Family in America*, a Genealogy of the descendants of John and William Goodrich, of Weth., Ct., Richard Goodrich, of Guilford, Ct., and William Goodridge of Watertown, Mass., etc. By Lafayette Wallace Case, M. D., Chicago, Ill., 8 vo. 417 pp. This last named work we have not seen.

Goodwin, in his Notes, p. 70, presents strong presumptive evidence of the relationship of JOHN and WILLIAM, of Wethersfield to the Rev. William Goodrich, of the estab. Church of England, who died in Hedgasett, Co. Suffolk, Eng., which fact, together with more recent investigations, since Goodwin wrote, identifies them as natives of that part of Eng. At their first coming to New Eng., they located at Watertown, Mass., where William received and recorded several pieces of land; and they came probably with the first general emigrates from Watertown to Wethersfield, 1636, where, also, they received land grands --- as see Chapt. VII, Vol. I.

The Goodriches of England were of an ancient lineage, antedating the Norman Conquest, at which time many of the name were in possession of lands, lordships and titles, which after the manner of those times, suffered confiscation at the hands of the Conqueror. "Doomsday Rolls" are especially full of the name, which originally was Goderic --- that is "Eric," prefixed by the name of the Deity. From the number enrolled as clergy, of various ranks, it is probable that many of the name sought, in the service of the Church, that refuge from absolute poverty and dependence to which they had been reduced by the confiscation of their estates. Goodrich Castle, a noble fortalice, and erected soon after the Conquest on the banks of the river Wye, as a protection for the West of England against the incursions of the Welsh, but, still remains (though in ruins since the War between Parliament and Charles the First,) indissolubly connected with the history of the family."
--- Henry F. Stiles, *History of Ancient Wethersfield*, 1904 (reprint 1987) p 369-370
============================================================ 
Goodrich, William "The Elder" (I225)
 
25 "History of the Town of Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, From Its Settlement in 1717 to 1829", Andrew H. Ward, Published by Samuel G. Drake, Printed by J. Howe, Printer, 1847 Keyes, Hulda (I3589)
 
26 "Humphrey Fenn was born probably at Wiggenhall St. German's, Norfolk, say 1526, and apparently remained in the area during his life. He reached the state of yeoman, or farmer [in the modern sense] of his own land, and his will indicates that he managed well. The registers of his parish are extant only after the mid 1600s and are thus no help with reconstructing his family. He named wife Agnes in his will ;the the 1585/6 will of their son William, she was called Annis. These names are interchangeable. She may have been a second wife, which is explained further on. After his death, widow Agnes married Nicholas Baxter, named in William's will." 1431

"He was named in the 1567 will of his brother Thomas." 1431

"Son Thomas, yeoman, a resident of Wiggenhall St. Mary's parish, prepared his will on 24 October 1567, and it was proved on 22 January 1567/8. Wiggenhall St. Mary's is about two walking miles from Wiggenhall St. german's, with the walk taking a person across St. German's bridge. In his will, Thomas named his wife Elizabeth; his children; mother Swayne, who was likely his wife's mother; his brother Robert Fenne, to whom he gave clothes; and his brother 'Umfrey,' with the request that Umfrey serve as executor." 1431

"Young Humphrey started his studies at Cambridge on 12 November 1568, when he was 16 years of age. His father's will is dated 26 November 1568. Imagination suggests that his father accompanied this eldest son the forty or so miles south, over the fens (marshy areas), for his entrance to the world of vast knowledge available at the school. Upon father Humphrey's arrival back home, in Wiggenhall St. German's, Norfolk, he likely became concerned that he should make sure young Humphrey would be financially able to stay at Cambridge, and he wrote his will 'withe myne owne hande.' Or maybe his health was already poor, and someone else took young Humphrey to the university. In his will, he mentioned 'this the tyme of my sycknes,' but the illness could have come after son Humphrey's departure. Father Humphrey allowed £60 for his son's education. He detailed it as follows [spelling changed to present usage': 'I will that the said sixty pounds given to the said Jumfry my son shall be paid or bestowed upon him in manner and form following, that is to say ten pounds yearly by the space of six years next after my decesase if the said Hy[m]fry my son shall continue in learning in the university during the said ears; and if he shall depart from learning in the university, before the said six years be expired, then I will the reisdue or so much of the said legacy of sixty pounds to him before given as shall be then unbestowed upon the said Humfrye at his said departure shall be detained, and kept from thenceforth to his use in the hands of my executor until he shall attain and come to his full age of twenty-one years.' " 1431

"Humphrey Fenn's will was dated 26 November 1568 and proved on 18 January 1568/9. The will is long. Following are extracts related to the present study [text to be entered] . . . to Anes my wyffe my meswage or tenement wth all the londs, meadows and pastuers therto belonginge . . .[about son Humfry, previously quoted] . . . to the seide Agnes my wiffe, all my stuffe of howsholde and my swyne and pultery withe all my fyrenge in the howse and yards and all my wheate strawe Rye strawe and beane strawe . . .The resdewe of all my goods and cattells . . . I gyve . . .them holy unto the seide Agnes my wiffe whome I order and make sole executrix of this my present testament and last will uppon condition that she shall within Thirtie daies next after my deceace uppn the reasonable request or demaunde of my Frynde, Clement Gybsonne stonde bounde withe sufficient sewertie or sewerties by a sufficient wrytinge obligatory unto the seide Clement Gybsonne his executors and assynes in two hundred pounds of Lawfull mony of englande, endorsed withe condition that she hir executors and assynes shall at hir or ther costs and chardgs well and honestly educate and brynge upp all my seide children untyll thei shall attayne and come to ther severall ages of seaventene years my seyd sonne humfrye excepted . . . and yf the seide Agnes my wyffe do refuse to seale and delyver, the seide obligation withe sufficient sewertye or sewertyes at the discreation of the seide Clement Gybson or shall not be able to Laye in sewertie or sewerties as aforeseide then I will my side wiffe shall Loose the benefyt of executor shipp savinge that then I gyve and bequeathe unto hir eight mylche neate, or the best my black geldinge xxti wether as thai rune xxti ewes as thei run ten eye hoggs of the best v combes of wheate fyve combes of rye and v combes of otes wch I will shallby delyvered unto hir, ymmediatly after suce refusall . . . and then I will that my brother in Lawe John wryght the elder shallbe my sole executor . . . ' " 1431

"Humphrey Fen of Coventry would confess in 1591 that it was 'about eight years now last past' that he and others began to 'treat and confer of the Discipline.' That would palce the beginning of formal conference in Warwickshire in 1583." 1804

"The militant voice fo the puritan press is a strong indication tat the leadership of the purtan movement had now found a sense of purpose and direction for which it was merely groping before 1584 . . 'Here have been a good company of godly brethren this Act,' Field was told by Edward Gellibrand of Magdalen, the secretary of the movement in Oxford, 'Master Fen, Wilcox, Axton, the Scottish ministers and we have had some meeting and conference, to our great comfort a=that are here.' " 1804

"As luck would have it, we possess what even Bancroft never saw: the formal Latin Acta of this assembly, headed 'September 8, 1587'. Among other things this document furnishes us with a lsit of names, arranged under counties, which probably indicates those who were normally to be written to in their districts, rather than the delegated attending this meeting. The correspondents for . .. Warwickshire, Cartwright and his close collaborator, Humphrey Fen of Coventry. . . " 1804

"At about the same time [the early weeks of 1588], the Discipline was subscribed in Warwickshire by twelve ministers, including cartwright; Humfrey Fen, vicar of Holy Trinity, Coventry, and after Cartwright the leading Warwickshire figure . . . The subscribers seem to have met either in Coventry or in Lord's vicarage of Wolston, six miles away." 1804

"it would not be possible to come closer to separation fromt he Church of the bishops and yet avoid final, open rupture. The correspondence of the ministers whose common mind these acts express confirms that by 1588 they were close indeed to schism. Humfrey Fen held it unlawful to receive the saraments at the hands of a non-preacher and to 'come to the ordinary service read in the church except it be of purpose to hear a sermon.' " 1804

"Private chaplaincies in puritan families lent themselves even more readily to presbyterian practice. . . When the earl of Leicester set out as captain-general for the Netherlands in 1585, his choice of Humbfey Fen of Coventry as a chaplain was confirmed by bothe the Warwickshire and London classes. 'I am ready to fun,' wrote Fen, 'if the Church command me, according to the hold decrees and orders of the Discipline.' " 1804

"Leicester's death had been preceded by the slow attrition of his political influence, to the advantage of enemies who were diametrically opposed toe Elizabeth's old favourite int heir religious poicy. The evidence of his church patronage suggests that in his prime Leicester lent his support with some consistenc to those best described as Grindalians: zealous preaching proatestants who were moderate puritans in their attitude to current controveries and not disposed to stand on their ecclesiastical dignity. But in his later years he moved closer to the more extreme, presbyterian fringe. He was friendly to John Field, installed Cartwright as master of his hospital at Warwick, and took Humfrey Fen and John Dnewstub as chaplains to the Netherlands during his captaincy-general." 1804

"On the following Sunday, February 9th [1589] Richard Bancroft preched at Paul's Cross a sermon which is rightly regarded as a minor landmark in English church history. . . . Surely this sermon was, as Whitgift later wrote, 'to special purpose', and no wonder that Stephen Egerton of Blackfriars wrote to humfrey Fen of Coventry: 'We expect no good in the cause of religion, we rather fear some evil.' " 1804

"It was presumably by means of these examinations and on the basis of the documentry evidence already accumulted that the choice was made of the ministers who were later to appear together in the Star Chamber. They were . . . Thomas cartwright, Humfrey Fen, Daniel Wight and Edward Lord of Warwickshire . . . " 1804

"[Stone] implies that this was one of a series of such meetings held in London at the hosues of Barber, Gardiner, Travers and Egerton throughout the emergency which had prevailed since the parliament of 1589, and attended from time to time by Chaderton of Cambridge, Brown of Oxford, Gifford of Essex, Allen of Suffolk and Sommerscales of Lincolnshire, as well as by those who were present in October 1590. The imprisoned ministers were by no means excluded fromt he urgent conference and correspondence with which the puritans were responding tot he crisis, and Snape's claim that he had been placed in 'close prison' should not be understood too literally. Cartwright was in the Fleet, King, Wight, Fen and Payne inthe clink. . . Fen had 'the liberty of the house and garden and access of friends', and he was allowed to go with his keeper to hear Lancelot Andrewes's sermons in St Paul's. Closer confinement followed his last appearance before the Commissioners in December. . . . Letters and forms of petition inevitably passed to and fro with the visitors." 1804

"the chance survival of one such letter, from fen to Edward Fleetwood, rector of Wigan and leader of the lancashire preachers, preserves almost the only evidence we possess from the Elizabethan period of consultation between the puritan ministers north and south of the Trent. [details to be entered]. 1804

"It was evidently in December or January 1590-91 that the prisoners began to ask their godly friends for more than prayers. The five ministers with parochial charges - Snape, Lord, Fen, Wight and Prowdlove - wrote to their congregations suggesting that they should petition the queen for their deliverance . . . A further indicatin of the lack of spontaneity of the petitions was that they were redrafted in London before being presented. Fen described a conversation with those who brought the petition from Coventry in which it was agreed that this should be done. The probability is strong that the puritan lawyers were responsibe for these alterations, as they may ahve been for the whole plan of concerted action. Robert Beale wrote to Whitgift on Fen's behalf, capitalizing his own connections with Coventry and referring to the appeals of his 'kinsfolk, allis and friends in those parts' and requesting Fen;s release on bail until the following term." 1804

"In the winer and spring of 1590-91, the High Commissioners worked industriously to obtain some kine of confession of these matters. Fen made a further appearance before Chirstmas, which was again characterized by 'obstinate contempt'. " 1804

"By this time [January, 1593], thanks to the queen's 'princely compassion', the prisoners in the Clink adn the White Lion - Wight, Fen, King, Payme and Lord - were allowed on a bail of forty poinds to go to church on Sundays, and Fen and King were permitted to leave their prisons on one other day in the week to conduct their necessary business. . . . One of the prisoners [ Not, I think, Fen, as the catalogue would sugget, but possible Prowdlove. there may have been some confusion of these documents in binding] had 'continually voided blood by urine' since October, and he bore the additional burden of a 'poor lame wife and seven small chidlren'. " 1804

"In Northamptonshire, it was thought in August [1603] that the puritan representation would consist of Walter Travers, John Reynolds of Oxford and Laurence Chaderton of Cambridge, with Knewstub from Suffolk and John ireton and Arthur Hildersham from Leicestershire. A later list, apparently composed by Patrick Galoway, names Reynolds, Hildersham, Chaderton and Knewstub, but substitutes Humfrey Fen of Coventry for Ireton and adds the name of Cartwright, who would be dead by the time that the postponed conference met in mid-January . . The two surviving extremists, Fen and Hildersham, were later dropped from the list." 1804

"As soon as it became clear that the new reign was to see not a new settlement of the Church but a coser definition and more active enforcement of the old, the solidarity of the puritan movement ont he carefully modulated programme of 1603 showed signs of foundering, witht he radicals complaining that their representatives had failed to convey the true gravity of the case. .. Humfrey Fen, himself a possible contender at Hampton Court, shared this conspiratorial view of 'that show of a dispute'. He is said to have written to Chaderton at the time with a pleas 'not to betray their cause', and almost thirty years later he would record the conviction that the spokemen had merely acted a part, like stage-players. They were men 'purposely chosen', who, 'excepting one reverene father, never took the question about ceremonies to heart.' " 1804

"The subscribing majority could still be described as puritans, although, like the ministers of Baxter's youth, relatively few of them were nonconformists. Life for many of them was far from intolerable. A number of bishops were stll sympathetic, and under their indulgent rule the conversion of England continued, especially as the ranks of parish and market-town lecturers continued to well. Some presbyterian veterans, like 'old Mr Fen of Coventry', trained their vision unimpaired. In the preamble to a will which proved too hot for the bishop's court to handle, he reaffirmed his faith in the discipline of the Church in detail, and roundly declared that the Church of England maintined 'a hameful schism against all the reformed church of the gospel.' 'Yet I do not hold it lawful for these corruptions to separate from communon of the churches of England, if therein a Christian may enjoy true doctrine, with the sacraments, froma minister able to teach the truth', and where it was not possible to avoid subscription." 1804 
Fenn, Humphrey (I4446)
 
27 "JOHN STRUTT of Glemsford, Suffolk, England, was born about the middle of the fifteenth century in the reign of Henry VI. His wife was named Elizabeth, sometimes called Isabell, since the two were synonymous then, much as Elizabeth and Betty are today.

"All that is known of John and Elizabeth comes from their wills, abstracts of which follow. He was apparently a blacksmith. In the 1542 [sic] Suffolk Subsidy (tax) Roll for Glemsford, she was taxed on �13.6.8. and paid 6s.8d." Abstracts of John and Elizabeth Strutt's wills follows. The abstract of her will is dated 22 September 1526. The date Threlfall gives above for the Suffolk Subsidy is perhaps a misprint for 1524. He gives the date her will was proved as 13 November 1626, which is certainly a misprint for 1526. Source: John Brooks Threlfall, Fifty Great Migration Colonists of New England and Their Origins, Madison, Wisconsin: Privately Printed, 1990 (reprinted at Bowie, Maryland: Heritage Books, 1992).



Name John STRUTT59
Birth Date say 1450
Will Dated Date 12 Sep 1516
Will Dated Place Glemsford, Suffolk, England
Will Proved Date 5 Feb 1516/7
Spouses
1 Elizabeth (Isabell) _____59
Will Dated Date 22 Sep 1526
Will Dated Place Glemsford, Suffolk, England
Children Thomas
John (->1516)
Robert (->1524)
Elizabeth (->1526)
Alice (-<1516)
Katherine (->1516)
Margery (->1516) 
Strutt, John (I2994)
 
28 "Joshua, m 28 Nov 1682, Hanna Bradford. She was a daughter of William Bradford Jr, Deputy Governor of Plymouth Colony and grand daughter of Governor William Bradford, who came over on the Mayflower, in 1620. She was born May 9, 1662, and died 28 May 27 1738.
They settled first at Hingham, MA, moved to Norwich, CT, 10 Oct 1688, and to Windham, 23 Mar.1691.
His first purchase of land in Windham, as appears in the record, was 26 May 1688. The first house in Windham was built in 1680. The inhabitants obtained a grant of town privileges in May 1692, the first town meeting was held 11 Jun 1692, and Mr. Ripley was elected the first town clerk and treasure. He was also a justice of the peace.

We copy the inscription that were placed over their graves. We give the first as far as it could be traced: the second appears to be complete.
'Here lies peacefully interred the body of Joshua Ripley, Esq, on of His Most Worshipful Magesty's Justices of the Peace, for the County of Windham, died' -- the town record says 8 May, 1739.
'Here lies interred the body of that most worthy, and virtuous, and most ingenuous gentlewoman, Mrs. Hanna B. Ripley, the well beloved consort of Joshua Ripley, Esq,., who after she had let a most lovely and eventful life, fell asleep in Jesus, May 28, 1738 in ye 75th year of her age.'
(from typed MS "compiled by Wilbur Lee and Shirley Ann Morgan, 776 Southport Street, Elmira, NY 14904, 25 April 1991") 
Ripley, Joshua (I4518)
 
29 "Joshua, m 28 Nov 1682, Hanna Bradford. She was a daughter of William Bradford Jr, Deputy Governor of Plymouth Colony and grand daughter of Governor William Bradford, who came over on the Mayflower, in 1620. She was born May 9, 1662, and died 28 May 27 1738.
They settled first at Hingham, MA, moved to Norwich, CT, 10 Oct 1688, and to Windham, 23 Mar.1691.
His first purchase of land in Windham, as appears in the record, was 26 May 1688. The first house in Windham was built in 1680. The inhabitants obtained a grant of town privileges in May 1692, the first town meeting was held 11 Jun 1692, and Mr. Ripley was elected the first town clerk and treasure. He was also a justice of the peace.

We copy the inscription that were placed over their graves. We give the first as far as it could be traced: the second appears to be complete.
'Here lies peacefully interred the body of Joshua Ripley, Esq, on of His Most Worshipful Magesty's Justices of the Peace, for the County of Windham, died' -- the town record says 8 May, 1739.
'Here lies interred the body of that most worthy, and virtuous, and most ingenuous gentlewoman, Mrs. Hanna B. Ripley, the well beloved consort of Joshua Ripley, Esq,., who after she had let a most lovely and eventful life, fell asleep in Jesus, May 28, 1738 in ye 75th year of her age.'
(from typed MS "compiled by Wilbur Lee and Shirley Ann Morgan, 776 Southport Street, Elmira, NY 14904, 25 April 1991") 
Bradford, Hannah (I4519)
 
30 "Kit" came to live with us. His mother died (pneumonia) and left 4 children. Carson (Kit) was the oldest at 6 years. Mom's brother was the father (Main). The children were separated, relatives took different ones. Kit was a shy, bookish , eager to please little guy, two years older than I, so we loved him as if he were a brother. Uncle Otto (Main) didn't remarry for ten years, then Kit went to live with his father and new wife. Uncle Otto was a painter; houses, barns, etc. but his hobby was painting pictures. Scenery for the backdrop curtains for the Opera House, country landscapes and such. However, an artist was considered little better than a "bum" then in Nebo." Source: Irene Hack Main, Carson (Kit) Estle (I1680)
 
31 "Little Grandmother"

1930 Census April 9th in Burton, Vashon Island Washington
===============
Birth: Oct. 8, 1839
Cattaraugus County
New York, USA
Death: Jul. 4, 1932
Vashon
King County
Washington, USA

Roxana Ruth Young was born to Hezekiah Lockwood and Caroline Tally Hoag Lockwood. She was married to Delos Palmer Young. They had the following children: William E. Young; Arthur Edgar Young, Charley H. Young (died as an infant), and Dora Hall Young.

Family links:
Children:
Charley H. Young (1865 - 1865)*
Arthur Edgar Young (1871 - 1945)*

Spouse:
Delos Palmer Young (1839 - 1913)

Burial:
Glenwood Cemetery
Mankato
Blue Earth County
Minnesota, USA

Created by: Never Forgotten
Record added: Sep 21, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 42205344 
Lockwood, Ruth Roxanne (I3663)
 
32 "Mr. Wheelock's Cure", by Christopher Gleason Clark, published in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume 152, July 1998.

The baptism record for Gershom was found in the Register at the village of Eccles, near Banham, Norfolk, England. The record reads as follows: "Gersham Wheelocke filius Radolphi Wheelocke baptisatus fuit 3 die Jan:1632/33". (Source: "Mr. Wheelock's Cure", by Christopher Gleason Clark, published in the July 1998 issue of New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol 152.)

William S. Tilden, "History of Medfield, Massachusetts, 1650-1886", 1886, writes the following about Gershom: "Gershom was in the list for Mr. Wilson's rate in 1657 [1], and probably came of age about that time. He married Hannah Stodder, daughter of John of Hingham, in 1658. In 1663, he had liberty from the town to cut "200 sedar plank" in the common swamp. His house stood on the Harbor Island road, a short distance south-west of the present residence of Charles Hamant. He rung the bell and swept the meeting-house in 1674, for which the town paid him 2 pounds, 15 shillings. The next year, he assisted in thatching the meeting-house. His house was burned by the Indians in 1676, and it appears to have been rebuilt on the same spot [2]. He died in 1684, and in 1690 his heirs sold the homestead to Joseph Plimpton."

Note [1]: Mr Wilson was the first minister in Medfield.

Note [2]: King Philips War. 
Wheelock, Gershom (I2952)
 
33 "Settled in Finch township. Eventually he went west." Margaret Cameron Cameron, Allan (I1067)
 
34 "Sgt." David was appointed May 1704, as Lieut. of the Htfd. Co. militia ordered to march to the relief of Hampshire Co., Mass., then threatened by Indians; and in Dec. of same year had another campaign. In that of 1709, he served as Capt., Adjt., and Regimental Qr. Master; in Feb. 1712, was on duty, as Capt. in Hampshire Co., and again in Aug. 1723, and in Oct. of the latter yr. was a member of the Col. Committee of War, and re-appointed (with rank of Col.) in 1725. With but few intervals, he represented Wetherfield, as dep. to the Gen. Ct. from 1716 to 1740; serving also in various committees. In Nov. 1724, he became a member of the Govenor's Council, continuing to serve as such afterwards, and during most of his life was Justice of the Peace, and many years a Justice of the Quorum."
--- Henry R. Stiles, *History of Ancient Wethersfield*, vol. II, 1904 (rep. 1987), p 374. Stiles lists 17 children.
 
Goodrich, Col. David (I3683)
 
35 "The English Ancestry of Joseph Clark (1613-1683) of Dedham and Medfield, Massachusetts", by Christopher Gleason Clark, Published in "New England Historical and Genealogical Register", Vol 152, January 1998.

The will for Thomas Clarke is published in "The New England Historical and Genealogical Register", Vol 152, January 1998, pg. 15, in an article by Christopher Gleason Clark, entitled "The English Ancestry of Joseph Clark (1613-1683) of Dedham and Medfield, Massachusetts". The will cites his grandaughter Marye Wheelock. This, along with other evidence presented in the article, strongly suggests the relationships among the Clarks, Wheelocks, and Barbers presented in this genealogy. 
Clarke, Thomas (I2950)
 
36 "The English Ancestry of Joseph Clark (1613-1683) of Dedham and Medfield, Massachusetts", by Christopher Gleason Clark, Published in "New England Historical and Genealogical Register", Vol 152, January 1998. Mary Canne (I2951)
 
37 "The English Ancestry of Joseph Clark (1613-1683) of Dedham and Medfield, Massachusetts", by Christopher Gleason Clark, Published in "New England Historical and Genealogical Register", Vol 152, January 1998. Clarke, Rebecca (I2956)
 
38 "The English Ancestry of Joseph Clark (1613-1683) of Dedham and Medfield, Massachusetts", by Christopher Gleason Clark, Published in "New England Historical and Genealogical Register", Vol 152, January 1998. Family F29
 
39 "there was my sister, Ima Lee. (Dad's name was Fred Lee Hack). She was a beautiful baby, child and woman— black, wavy hair— dark eyes, creamy complexion. By the time I got around to noticing, here was me, skinny, freckles on every exposed part of my body, red hair and a temper to match. We never had anything (it seemed) in common till much later in life. Now we are very fond of each other and laugh about the squabbles we used to have long ago." Source: Irene Hack
============================

Jerome Cemetery Grave: 2-BB-46 
Hack, Ima Lee (I195)
 
40 "Thomas was a farmer, a blacksmith and possibly a carriage builder. His home occpied one side of the Sugar Loaf Road where it joined Jockey Hollow Road. AccrossSugar Loaf Road stood his son, Joshua's smithy and two buildings which were used as a carriage factory. This is according to archealogical work which as done on the site for the restoration of the buildings when the site was added to the Historical Park. Thomas and his family were occupying the house when the surrounding territory was used for the encampment of the American Army at Jockey Hollow in 1777 and 1779-1780" Source: US Dept. of Interior - Morristown National Historical Park, Morristown, NJ Dec 24, 1934
--------------------------

"There was living in Morris County, New Jersey, during the eighteenth century one, Thomas Guerin, who was born about 1713. According to family tradition he was a French Huguenot coming to America as a boy or young man. It has been said that he could trace his ancestry back to DeGuerin, Count of Auvern and Duke of Aquitaine during the reign of Emperor Charlemagne."

Source: "Through the Years: A Study of the Geron, Geren, Garren Families" by Mary Bivins Geron Countess and Jac E. Countess (printed 1967):
------------------------ 
Guerin, Thomas (I711)
 
41 'MALE, IN THE 1900 CENSUS, BORN IN DEC. 1896 PER THE 1900 CENSUS, BUT NAME READS OLIVE M McGINNIS, FEMALE, IN THE 1910 CENSUS' McGinnis, Cloise M (I2362)
 
42 (Gi-Yo-Sti-Ko-yo-He), oldest sister of Doublehead, was born about 1736 and married John Watts.  Wu-teh (Wer-teh) (Gi-Yo-Sti-Ko-yo-He) (I4684)
 
43 (I) James Morgan, son of William Morgan, of Llanvabon, Wales, sailed from Bristol, England, in the ship "Mary," accompanied by a kinsman, Robert Morgan, in the summer of 1636, and landed at Boston. He first settled at Sandy Bay, near Gloucester, but becoming dissatisfied with the bleak coast, and finding that the Indians were a great annoy
ance as well as a pressing menace, removed to Roxbury, where he married, August 6, 1640, Margery Hill, of that place, and most of their children were born there. It was in that place that he was made a freeman, May 10, 1643, and he was a freeholder there as late as 1649-50, when he removed to Pequot, now New London, Connecticut, in company with many other families of Sandy Bay, headed by their pastor, Rev. Richard Bliman. On February 10, 1650, land was assigned to him "on the path to New street, being six acres of upland where the wigwams are, in the path that goes from his house toward Culvers, among the Rocky Hills." He was one of a committee, in 1661, "to lay out the bounds of N. London on the east side of the Great River." It is recorded that the following year that "James Morgan, Mr. Tinker and Obiadiah Brown are chosen to seat the people in the meeting-house, which they doing the inhabitants are to rest silent." That year, 1662, he was appointed one of a committee to contract to build a house for the ministry at New London, and he signed himself "James Morgan, Senior, of New London." That year he stood third highest in amount among the taxpayers, certifying to holding 250 pounds. He died in his own homestead, about three miles from Groton, in 1685, aged seventy-eight years. Children: 1. Hannah, born May 18, 1642; married, November 20, 1660, Nehemiah Royce. 2. James, born March 3, 1644; married, November, 1666, Mary Vine. 3. John, see forward. 4. Joseph, born November 29, 1646; married, April, 1670. Dorothy Park. 5. Abraham, born September 3, 1648, died August,
1649. 6. A daughter, born November 17,
1650, died an infant. 
Morgan, James (I4417)
 
44 (not found in the published records) Family F1241
 
45 (Research):1880 Census St Joseph Missouri
NameAge
William G. Lee39
Fannie Lee36
Walter Lee17
Agnes Lee14
Clarence Lee12
Henry Lee9
Fannie Lee6
================================
1880 Census Tywappity, Mississippi, Mo
Name RelationMarital StatusGenderRaceAgeBirthplaceOccupationFather's BirthplaceMother's Birthplace
Wm. SNELLING Self M Male W 30 KY Farmer KY KY
Nancy SNELLING Wife M Female W 42 KY Keeping House KY KY
Dolly DALTON SDau S Female W 12 MO At Home TN KY
Elmina LEE Niece S Female W 11 MO At Home KY MO
Wm. H. LEE Nephew S Male W 9 MO At Home KY MO
Mary DALTON SDau S Female W 20 MO At Home TN MO 
Lee, William Henry (I1518)
 
46 (Research):Hello! I read with much interest your tree with the Young information. My g-g-grandmother was Alantha Polley Young, who was Delos' sister. I have quite a bit of Young information to share, and would love to exchange info with you. I have some pictures of Delos' and Ruth's family, and a picture of Ruth, and quite a few newspaper clippings from when they lived in Minnesota.  Young, Delos Palmer (I3664)
 
47 (Submitted by Gib Ramage) Orie's mother Lesie's maiden name was Miller. She married Robert Lee who fathered Bob, Ray and Orie Lee. Following Robert Lee's death she married Grandpa Miller who fathered Vic.

"My grandmother was raised in the old southern traditions, she went to a young women's seminary, and was accompanied everyplace by her "negro mammy" Mary (her words)" from a letter written by Robert Earl Lee, Jr to Marty Lee

From 1880 Census in Iowa, Doniphan, Kansas
Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race AgeBirthplaceOccupationFather's BirthplaceMother's Birthplace
Robert M. BIGHAM Self M Male W 43 MO. Farmer TN. KY.
Amanda J. BIGHAM Wife M Female W 33 MO. MO. IN.
Lessarah BIGHAM Dau S Female W 7 KS. MO. MO.
Maggie BIGHAM Dau S Female W 1 KS. MO. MO.
============================================
I found our Lessie Ellen Lee who is Lessarah E.
(Bigham) LEE, Miller who died1 Oct 1952 in Hood River, Hood River Co.,
Oregon. buried there also.This information is from her grandaughter Linda
who has the family bible. Lessie and her family the 3 little 3 boys , new
husband Robert Miller who she married in St. Jo on 12 Mar 1901,and her
father Robert Bigham and #2 wife and children (see 1900 Jefferson Twp,
Andrew Co., Mo census) left soon for Idaho where they resided before
removing to Eastern Oregon. So that gets the Lee/Miller family to Oregon.
Source Sharron Ross
_________________________________________
1892 Lessie married WIlliam Henry Lee in St Joseph MO
1897 William Henry Leee dies in in Avenue City MO ( just outside of St Joseph)
1901 Lessie married Robert Miller in St Joseph, MO
1910 Lessie & Robert are in Filer Idaho with one son and her three sons 
Bigham, Lessarah Ellen (I1519)
 
48 12th Chief of Glen Nevis, at the time of the '45. Listed as Captain in Lochiel's regiment.

It is noted he had 5 children living in 1746, when his house was burnt.

Surrendered ca March 1746 on parole at Inverary. Transferred to Edinburgh Castle March 1747, with Duncallon (Ref. London papers March 1747). Released July 1747 with Act of Indemnity. 
Cameron, Alexander 12th Chief of Glen Nevis (I4469)
 
49 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Cameron, Sir Ewen 5th of Lochiel, 17th Chief of Clan Cameron (I4494)
 
50 1810 Washington County, Virginia census:
Welcom Martin
one male 10 thru 15. - John T. Martin - 1795/1800
one male 26 thru 44. - William Welcome Martin - 5 Feb 1772.
six females under 10. - ____ Martin:1800/1810; - ___ Martin:1800/1810; - Hannah:10 Feb 1802; Martha Martin:15 May 1804; Anna Martin: 1800/1810; Cella Martin:1800/1810.
two female 10 thru 15. - Mary Martin: 1795/1800; ____ Martin: 1795/1800.
one female 16 thru 25. - Mary (Trimble) Martin: 1785/1795.
one slave

-------------------------------
CENSUS: 1820 Monroe County, Kentucky census.
Welcome Martin
one male 16 under 26. - John T. Martin - 1794/1804.
one male 45 and upwards. - William Welcome Martin - 5 Feb 1772.
four females under 10. ____ Martin:1810/1820; Julia Martin:1810/1820; Elizabeth Freelove Martin: October 1817; Matilda Martin:2 Oct 1819.
two females 10 under 16. Cella Martin:1804/1810; Anna Martin:1804/1810.
one female 16 under 26. Martha Martin:1794/1804 - 15 May 1804.
one female 26 under 45. Mary (Trimble) Martin - 1775/1

-------------------------------
Welcome Martin did make a will, however, it did not survive the destructon of the Monroe County, Kentucky Court House fires. Welcome Martin made his will sometime before 22 May 1824 when daughter Celia married John Davis.] The ones that were married are shown with husbands.] This indenture made this _____ day of _____in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirty Six. Between John C. Roper and Hannah Roper his wife, Philip Mulkey and Martha Mulkey his wife, John Davis and Celia Davis his wife. Silas Mayberry and Anne Mayberry his wife, Eliza Martin and Julia Martin legal heirs and representatives of Welcome Martin dec'd, of the one part. William Berry of the County of Monroe and State of Kentucky of the other part. [This next document was made in Missouri, where John Davis was living by then.] Know all men by these present that we, John Davis and James Tade do bind ourselves....unto William Hudspeth, executor of Welcome Martin, deceased in the sum of eighty dollars to which payment will be made unto William Hudspeth, his heirs....as witness our hands and seals this 1st day of July 1843.... The condition of the above is such that whereas Welcome Martin by his last will and testament gave his daughter Celia, a legacy of his estate among his several heirs equally and since making of the said will, the said Celia intermarried to the aforesaid John Davis by whom she had six living children and since Celia has departed this life, Now, in case should the said children, heirs of Celia ever claim anything of the said Hudspeth as executor of the said Martin, said Davis and Tade is to refund the executor the sum of forty dollars with lawful interest form the above date written and it is to be further understood that at any time should any of the said legacy be necessary or any part thereof be wanting to discharge any debts....which the said last will and testament shall have no other ___ to pay them in case the said John Davis or James Tade....shall return the said legacy or such part threof that maybe necessary for the payment of said debt as a proportional part thereof. Signed, Sealed this day and year above written. Signed John Davis, James Tade, Witt:John C. Roper. - Source - Mary Ellen Baker - e-mail - vbaker@ntc.net

Source - The Thomas Family History Organization
--------------------
MILITARY: Washington County to Wit. This day came Welcom Martin before me James Keys a Justice of the Peace for the County aforesaid & produced a Capts Commission and took the oaths prescribed by Law. Given under my hand this 23 day November 1804 James Keys. - Source - Washington County, Virginia Will Book, 2. Page, 486.
--------------------
ESTATE INVENTORY: Washington County to wit - Agreeable to an order to us Directed from said Court after being Duely Sworn we have viewed and Appraised all the personal Estate of Thomas John Deceased to us produced with the following manner.
One Cow & Calf & a two year old hifher. 5.5
One Silver watch 4.10
One hat & brush. 1.4
One feather Bed & Bed Cloaths 5.12.9
Old Clothing .9
Overhalls 2 pair & 2 shirts .18
3 Closebodied Coats & one Jacket 4.4
One Big Coat & sones New Cloth 3.10
4 pair of Stockings on handkerff .6.6
4 Books one looking glass & razor .12
One Pocket Compas 1 pair of shew Buckles .8
One pair of Sleeve Bottons .1.6
One Saddle & one Dres Deer Skin - one
pair of shews an pair of mets .17.6
One set of Plow irons or small rope
& Branding iron & one axe ___ &
Crooked ____ .17
One Kettle & Skillet .8.6
One jug & Bottle Canteen and Iron weg .4.10
One Chest & Pocket Book .16
One Trunk & Bedsteads & cords .10
One Note on Richard Comer for 10 Dollars 3.0.0
One Note on Richard Comer for 5.4.6
One Note on Levy Bishop for 9.0.0
One Note on Amey Dun for 1.18.
One Note on John Comer for 12.10.9.
One Note on Adadiah Sheerwood & Hugh Cole for 3.0.0
One Note on Welcom Martain for 1.10
One Note on Thomas & Samuel Douglass for 3.12
Some Cash to the amt of 14.2.10
One Note on Saml Robinett for 25 Dollars 7.10
Total 92.2.8
The with appraisement is a true Statement of the Personal Estate of
Thomas John Decesed to us produced Given under our hands this 21st
day of June 1806.
Executors.............................................. Appraisers
Thos. Thomas.......................................Henry Baker
Abijah Thomas......................................Jopeh Cole
...............................................................David Denton
At a Court held for Washington County the 21st day of October 1806.
This Inventory and appraisement of the Estate of Thomas John decd
was returned to court and ordered to be recorded - Attest D. Campbell D.C., - Source - Washington County, Virginia Will Book Number 3. Pages, 18 & 19.
-------------------
ESTATE SETTLEMENT: Do..Thomas Thomas to the estate of John Thomas decd.
To the amt of Sale $117.17. To Jno Cole note with 10 years & 7 mo ints $24.50. - $205.67.
To Philip Mintons note $10.71. - To Wm Bakers note $4.00 - $14.71.
To Noah Bishops note & ints $14.56. - To Mary Bakers note $11.00. - $25.56.
To James Denton & ints $0.83. To John Morton ints[?] $18.00. - $18.83.
To William Tilson note & ints $10.00. To William Morton $73.75. - $83.75.
To Patrick Adams & ints $8.00. To Patrick Adams $6.68. - $14.68.
To gold $352. - Silver $369.45. Notes on Joseph Thomas $20. - $741.45.
[Total] $1100.65.
By cash paid to appraisers $4.59. By cash pd Clerk of Court $.0.70. - $5.29.
By cash paid the Sheriff $4.85. By cash the Sheriff $0.31. - $5.16.
By Funeral expense $9.00. By expense of Sale $7.00 - $16.
By Commission as Executor at 5 pd $55.03.
By Cash pd attorneys fee $2.50. By a piece of gold counterfeit $7.11 - $9.61.
By Clerks fees for recording settlement $1.50.
By Daniel Soes [or Loes] Recpt $139.31-3/4. By Jno T. Mortons Rect $139.31-3/4. - $278.63-1/2.
By Philip Mulkey Recpt $139.31-3/4. By Jno C. Roper Rect $139.31-3/4. - $278.63-1/2.
By Commissioners fees for settling with executor $3.
[Total] 652.86.
Remaining in the hands of executor $447.79.
Which is to be equally divided between the executor & the heirs of Abijah Thomas decd - We find due the sd heirs $223.89, with interest from the first day of August 1822.
We find the sd executor has settled with George & Sally Allen heirs of Abijah Thomas for their part of Jno Thomas decd estate. After being sworn for that purpose & in compliance of an order of the County Court of Washington County VA, bearing date Nov 25th 1822 we have adjusted the administration act of Thomas Thomas executor of John Thomas decd and find the same as above stated. Given under our hand this 21 February 1824.
Henry B. Thompson
George Byars
James Hull
- Source - Washington County, Virginia Probate Record Book, 10. Page, 37 or 39.
- NOTE: In the above Estate Settlement the Philip Mulkey, Daniel "Soes" or "Loes" [Daniel Lough] & John C. Roper are sons-in-law to William Welcome Martin & Anna (Thomas) Martin. John T. Morton [Martin] is the son of William Welcome Martin and Anna (Thomas) Martin. 
Martin, Wlilliam Welcome (I2637)
 

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