Ramage Family History

Notes


Matches 151 to 200 of 1,386

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151 a soldier of The Queen in defence of British North America in the Upper Canada Rebellion, a hero of the Battle of the Windmill, etc. Linnen, Adam (I2804)
 
152 A story is told concerning the birth of Matilda Merritt, now Mrs. Davis, the first white child born in the township, which may illustrate not only the friendliness of the Indians, but also the humanity in the heart of the 'race as a whole. Mrs. Merritt was alone, her husband and father in-law having gone to a raising. Two old squaws living near, discovered her in the midst of travail and pain ; they came to her relief, bringing their experience, and, with hearts full of sympathy, and kind and tender hands, performed the delicate service of midwives, in this her hour of sorrow.
HISTORY OF MORROW COUNTY 
Merritt, Matilda (I3950)
 
153 A tailor, he was at Springfield, MA by 1648. Selectman for 13 years; deputy 1680, 1683 and 1684. Married first Feb. 13, 1651/2 Esther WRIGHT (d. Apr. 3, 1664), daughter of Dea. Samuel and Margaret (STRATTON) WRIGHT of Springfield, MA; and second Dec. 28, 1664, probably at Springfield, MA. Marshfield, Samuel (I2470)
 
154 A veteran of the War of 1812 who served as a sergeant in the North Carolina Militia. He received a land bounty in Missouri for his service. His first wife was Isabel Edith Baker. He is buried next to his second wife, Priscilla Smith in the Oakridge Cemetery in Andrew Co Missouri McDonald, Alexander Russell (I4539)
 
155 A writer, news reporter and Editor for the Spokane Chronicle
====================================================
Donald Rice was cremated and his remains were scattered from the North Fork Yachats Bridge, ORgeon.

The rustic covered bridge spanning the North Fork of the Yachats River, built in 1938, and was the last covered span constructed by veteran bridge builder Otis Hamer.

HOW TO GET THERE: From Yachats travel approximately 7 miles east on Yachats River Road to N Yachats River Road. At the intersection turn north and travel approximately 1.5 miles.
Latitude: 44°18'35.9"N Longitude: 123°58'10.9"W 
Rice, Donald Gene (I3425)
 
156 Aaron Green was the son of Thomas Green and Elisabeth Green. He married Lydia Needham July 8, 1784 in South Brimfield, Hampden, Massachusetts. They had the following children: Betsy, Pamella, Aaron, Lodisa, Huldah, Daniel, Sophia and Julia (Young).
Burial:
Wales Cemetery
Wales
Hampden County
Massachusetts, USA
------------------------------
Birth: 1756, USA
Death: Jul. 28, 1830
Wales Hampden County Massachusetts, USA


Family links:
Children:
Julia Warren Green Young (1808 - 1890)*

Burial: Wales Cemetery #1 Wales, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA

Source by: Never Forgotten
Record added: Feb 02, 2009
Find A Grave Memorial# 33485393 
Green, Aaron (I3670)
 
157 ABBR 1920 Census Source (S122)
 
158 ABBR 1920 Census, Roll T625_1500, page7A, Ed 86, image 1062 Source (S164)
 
159 ABBR A dictionary of Scottish Emigrants to Canada before ConfederationTEXT 9220 William Ramage arrived Quebec on the Prompt, 8 July 1817 Loc. 18 Aug1817, Lot 24SW, Con 9, Edwardsburg Twp, Grenville Co . Ont. ICS-1
[ICS = Immigration: Canada from Scotland] 
Source (S144)
 
160 ABBR A family orchard: leaves from the hunter tree http://freepages.misc.rootsweb.com/~database/HUNTER.htm Source (S151)
 
161 ABBR Alistar M. CameronTEXT Alistar M. Cameron A.A.G.R.A. PO Box 215 Bundanoon, NSW 2578 Australia Source (S147)
 
162 ABBR Annals of the S.W.R Jones Family - Corrected by Genevieve Jones 1991 Source (S126)
 
163 ABBR Danes & New EnglandersTEXT Danes & New Englanders
Title: http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:1890547&id=I1241
Author: William Lord 
Source (S166)
 
164 ABBR Daughter Marion's 1920 Census, Roll T625_1500, page7A, Ed 86, image 1062 Source (S163)
 
165 ABBR dcolgan256@aol.comTEXT dcolgan256@aol.com submitted the town in Ireland from Ancestry.com Source (S165)
 
166 ABBR From Cemetary marker Source (S182)
 
167 ABBR FTW Descendants of David Bybee and Sarah Giles Contact; Heather Harlan Source (S127)
 
168 ABBR GEDCOM File : JANERA~1.ged Source (S2)
 
169 ABBR GEDCOM File : Lee Miller 1.ged
ABBR GEDCOM File : Lee Miller 1.ged 
Source (S53)
 
170 ABBR Gib Ramage Source (S162)
 
171 ABBR Horse Neck Founders History and Genealogy Society Source (S54)
 
172 ABBR Hubbard , Marion County, Cemetary Records Source (S124)
 
173 ABBR LetterTEXT Per Letter from David Frame, dated October 29, 2002. Source (S159)
 
174 ABBR Oregon death record #2555 Source (S129)
 
175 ABBR Personal Knowledge Source (S51)
 
176 ABBR Reid's Death Notices of OntarioTEXT "At Edwardsburgh, on 25th Sept., Wm Ramage. Agged 69 years, a native ofScotland
Page 70, Posted in The Christian Guardian on Nov 5, 1831 
Source (S142)
 
177 ABBR Richard Barrett LEE at Lee/Miller reunion August 2002 Source (S33)
 
178 ABBR Source: David Frame 8-27-2002 Source (S143)
 
179 ABBR Source: David Frame 8-27-2002 Source (S148)
 
180 ABBR Steve ParkesTEXT Steve Parkes Source (S167)
 
181 ABBR Susan Jeanne (Susie) LEE at Lee/Miller reunion August 2002 Source (S46)
 
182 ABBR Wedding invitation Source (S52)
 
183 ABBR World Family Tree Vol. 2, Ed. 1
Customer pedigree.

Source Media Type: Family Archive CD 
Source (S5)
 
184 Abel married Lydia Gholson, daughter of Francis Gholson and Mary Craig, on 11 Oct 1816 in Maury, TN. (Lydia Gholson was born on 15 Jun 1792 in TN and died on 1 Jul 1850 in White, IL .) Rice, Abel (I389)
 
185 Abraham and Marie purchased William Henrie?s house in 1848. This house is called ?The Creole House? and has a history of the family living there for about 3 decades. William Henrie also purchased two other parcels of land of 40 acres each in 1838 and they are recorded as being in Kaskaskia, Illinois.

In 1840 William Henrie built a grist and flour mill which later he sold (in 1848) to his son-in-law Abraham H. Lee who, with Lee?s partner, Frank Brickey, upgraded the mill and reopened it in the late 1850?s. Abraham?s occupation was also a miller, like his father-in-law and he and his partner Frank Brickey ran Brickey & Lee grist and flour mill for several years.

William Henrie served as Justice of the Peace until age 65, in Prairie du Rocher until 1860. William died Aug 1865 but it is unsure as to where he died, probably somewhere in Illinois or Missouri near Prairie du Rocher. Marie Henrie died April 1877 in St. Louis, Missouri. Both are buried in Calvary Cemetery, St. Louis, St. Louis Co., Missouri.

Marie Josephine (nee Henrie) and Abraham Lee had several children. Sometime after the birth of the last child Marie became ill and was infirm until her death in 1867.

An interesting story and a bit of fortune and misfortune came upon the Abraham Lee family. In the spring of 1867Abraham purchase a lottery ticket for $5.oo for a chance on a prize in the Chicago Crosby Opera House national raffle which included the Opera house itself, several valuable paintings, and other items. It was not known for several days that Abraham was actually the winner of the opera house itself. Word was sent to Prairie du Rocher via telegram and a fast horse from St. Louis. Due to Marie?s ill health Abraham could not go to Chicago immediately, but when he did the decision was to sell the opera house back to Mr. Crosby for $200,000 instead of taking possession. $200,000 was a fortune at the time. (The Crosby Opera House was later destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire in 1871) Lee sold his interest in the mill to his business partner and built a beautiful mansion fitted out very expensively, with colored glass windows, special woods, huge rooms, and a library filled with books of special interest. Sadly, Marie Josephine Lee did not live long to enjoy their new family status as she died in September 1867. Abraham followed a couple of years later of an apparent heart attack while on a trip to Cincinnati, Ohio. The mansion that Abraham built fell into disrepair and was destroyed in a fire in 1970.

The death of Abraham and Marie left only one child at his majority and that was Roger Samuel Lee (RELIII great-great grandfather). The other Lee children, being minors, were put under guardianship of their grandmother Marie Henrie, who was residing in St. Louis. Here they stayed until their majority or entered upon their own lives. Roger S. Lee enlisted in the military at the age of 19 in 1866 just a year before his mother?s death and married 1870 in Buchanan County, Missouri.
 
Henrie, Marie Josaphine (I4053)
 
186 Abraham and Marie purchased William Henrie?s house in 1848. This house is called ?The Creole House? and has a history of the family living there for about 3 decades. William Henrie also purchased two other parcels of land of 40 acres each in 1838 and they are recorded as being in Kaskaskia, Illinois.

In 1840 William Henrie built a grist and flour mill which later he sold (in 1848) to his son-in-law Abraham H. Lee who, with Lee?s partner, Frank Brickey, upgraded the mill and reopened it in the late 1850?s. Abraham?s occupation was also a miller, like his father-in-law and he and his partner Frank Brickey ran Brickey & Lee grist and flour mill for several years.

William Henrie served as Justice of the Peace until age 65, in Prairie du Rocher until 1860. William died Aug 1865 but it is unsure as to where he died, probably somewhere in Illinois or Missouri near Prairie du Rocher. Marie Henrie died April 1877 in St. Louis, Missouri. Both are buried in Calvary Cemetery, St. Louis, St. Louis Co., Missouri.

Marie Josephine (nee Henrie) and Abraham Lee had several children. Sometime after the birth of the last child Marie became ill and was infirm until her death in 1867.

An interesting story and a bit of fortune and misfortune came upon the Abraham Lee family. In the spring of 1867Abraham purchase a lottery ticket for $5.oo for a chance on a prize in the Chicago Crosby Opera House national raffle which included the Opera house itself, several valuable paintings, and other items. It was not known for several days that Abraham was actually the winner of the opera house itself. Word was sent to Prairie du Rocher via telegram and a fast horse from St. Louis. Due to Marie?s ill health Abraham could not go to Chicago immediately, but when he did the decision was to sell the opera house back to Mr. Crosby for $200,000 instead of taking possession. $200,000 was a fortune at the time. (The Crosby Opera House was later destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire in 1871) Lee sold his interest in the mill to his business partner and built a beautiful mansion fitted out very expensively, with colored glass windows, special woods, huge rooms, and a library filled with books of special interest. Sadly, Marie Josephine Lee did not live long to enjoy their new family status as she died in September 1867. Abraham followed a couple of years later of an apparent heart attack while on a trip to Cincinnati, Ohio. The mansion that Abraham built fell into disrepair and was destroyed in a fire in 1970.

The death of Abraham and Marie left only one child at his majority and that was Roger Samuel Lee (RELIII great-great grandfather). The other Lee children, being minors, were put under guardianship of their grandmother Marie Henrie, who was residing in St. Louis. Here they stayed until their majority or entered upon their own lives. Roger S. Lee enlisted in the military at the age of 19 in 1866 just a year before his mother?s death and married 1870 in Buchanan County, Missouri.
 
Lee, Abraham Hagerman (I4052)
 
187 ACCORDING TO 1909 TAYLOR REUNION THIS FAMILY MOVED TO OAKWOOD, OKLAHOMA Taylor, Henry Allen (I1889)
 
188 ACCORDING TO 1909 TAYLOR REUNION, ALFRED MARRIED BUT NO MORE KNOWN ON HIM Taylor, Alfred (I1865)
 
189 ACCORDING TO 1909 TAYLOR REUNION, McCLUNG MARRIED AND HAD AT LEAST 3 SONS. HE REPORTEDLY MOVED TO TEXAS. Taylor, McClung (I1877)
 
190 According to a pedigree chart found in the records of the Henthorne nuns, Captain John Price, 1608 -1659 who came to Maryland with Calvert Member of the House of Burgesses from the beginning. In charge of Gov. Calvert's estate inventory @ his death 30 Jul 1647. 1647 assignment of Pinnace from Leonard Calvert to John Price. Emigrated 1636 on "The Ark." From the chart it appears that Captain John Price had a step-son, Thomas, a son Elisha, and a son Roswell (Russell) Sage Price, and probably other unnamed children. He was probably of Welsh descent.
SIBLINGS: He might have been one of 13 children. He might have been the youngest. He might have had a sibling, Mordecai.
======================================
Notes for John PRICE Captain

Regarding Black and White John Price
Two Adventurers bearing the name of John Price were transported by the Ark, both by the Wintour brothers, one being styled "white" John Price and the other "black" John Price. Circumstances and knowledge of conditions of the times refute the oft repeated statement that the Black John Price was a Negro. The only Negroes of that period outside of Africa were slaves or bondsmen and in the 17th and 18th centuries Negro slaves were without a family name, as decreed by law and custom. It is therefore believed that one was of a light complexion and the other of a dark complexion, thus being styled as "white" and "black" for differentiation.

To follow out the careers of these two Adventurers in Maryland has been difficult, and no further reference has been found in the Archives of Maryland to identify these men other than the claims of Ferdinando Pulto in 1639 for land rights by assignment from the Wintour brothers.

At the opening day of the General Assembly of January 25, 1637/8, a "John Price of St. Maries hundred planter" appeared and was given the right of a seat. (1) Following out the career of this John Price, it proves definitely that he was the later Captain John Price and then Colonel John Price who emigrated in 1636 as the following will show: (2)

"Capt John Price came and demanded 100 Acres of Land for Transporting One Able Man Servant Vizt Richard Brown in this Province in the year 1637 and 200 acres more for 2 other Able Men Servants Vizt Thomas Jackson and William Hardidge Transported by him into this Province in the year 1636 and 100 More for Transporting one other Man Servant vizt Edward Williams in the Year 1644 and 100 acres for Transporting himself into this Province about 11 years since."

The month and day of the foregoing instrument is December 20, but the year is not noted, but from circumstances of nearby entries, it is believed to be the year 1648.

The question therefore arises whether this John Price is one of the two who was transported by the Wintours and had returned to England or another part of the British possessions in America and reentered on or about 1636 transporting two servants. It is known that at least two of the Adventurers on the Ark returned to England and brought back their families, but their names were of a certain character that no doubts existed as to identity. In this instance one is dealing with the extremely common name of John Price, and it will always leave some doubt in the mind of the genealogist whether the John Prices, the two Adventurers, succumbed to an early death in the Province, or whether one returned to England and emigrated in 1636 and ultimately distinguished himself in the military affairs of the Province and was appointed a member of His Lordship's Council.

In 1648 John Price deposed to be aged 40, so he was born in or about 1608 and was in his late twenties when he emigrated in 1636. He signed his name and there are no other known instances of a John Price making his mark to indicate that there may have been two contemporary John Prices.

On February 18, 1638/9, he was domiciled in St. Michael's Hundred and was elected with James Cauther by the freemen to the first elected General Assembly held in the Province. (3) In 1642 he was assessed 46 lbs. tob. for the accounts of the Province, and at the same Assembly his proxy was held by Captain Thomas Cornwalys. In the expedition against the Sesquihanowes Indians, commanded by Captain Henry Fleete in 1644, Fleete was given instructions by John Lewger, Secretary of the Province, to consult with several men in all matters of importance, among whom was John Price, Planter. (4)

On January 20, 1647/8, Captain John Price appeared at the General Assembly holding eight proxies from St. George's Hundred. (5) Four days later he assigned his proxies to Mr. William Thompson. In 1648 he was appointed to the Upper House by the Lord Proprietary, (6) but soon lost his seat when the Puritans took over. In that year he was styled "Muster Maister" of the Province.

His name was totally absent from the activities of the Province during the Puritan usurpation, thus denoting his alignment with the Proprietary Party. Upon the restoration of legitimate power by the Calverts, or on January 12, 1659/60, Cecilius, Lord Baltimore, appointed "our dear friend & Councellor Coll John Price" to the Upper House. (7)

On June 17, 1647, he was the Captain of the Fort at St. Inigoes and stated that there was a great need of corn for the maintenance of the soldiers. In the same year he was one of the appraisers of the personal estate of Governor Leonard Calvert.

He attended a session of the Council in December 1660. On February 10, 1660/1, he drew up his last will and testament which was probated on March 11, 1660/1, in St. Mary's County by William Wilkinson, Thomas Dent, and William Hatton. (8) He left a step-son and an only child, Anne Price, a minor at the time of his death.

Sources:
1. Archives, vol. 1, p. 3;
2. Liber ABH, folio 10, Land Office;
3. Archives, vol. 1, pp. 29, 32;
4. Archives, vol. 3, p. 150;
5. Archives, vol. 1, p. 214;
6. Archives, vol. 3, pp. 211, 213;
7. Archives, vol. 1, p. 382;
8. Wills, Liber folio 141
(Source: "The Flowering of the Maryland Palatinate - Biographies of the Adventurers," furnished by Stephen Henthorne to Eileen Williams) 
Price, Captain John (I3503)
 
191 According to Census data, there was a Justus Lockwood in Columbia Co., NY
in 1810; in Renselaer Co., NY in 1820 and in Hinsdale, Cattaraugus Co.,
NY in 1830 (near Anthony Caswell). 
Lockwood, Justus (I3666)
 
192 According to Lois McCarthy, Thomas H Evans was born in Woodford Co, KY (near Versailles). He left there between 1825 & 1828 and moved to Lexington, Lafayette Co, MO. He moved from there to Platte Co, MO about 1840. Thomas came to Oregon from Platte Co, MO by wagon train in 1852 and arrived in Oregon City on Sept 20, 1852 according to the Donation Land Claim papers and other documents of James Cooper, who was a part of the Evans wagon train along with along with Thomas's daughter - "Sena" Evans Cooper and their son - Thomas.

The Evans wagon train departed from St. Joseph, MO. Thomas H. Evans was captain of the wagon train with which his family traveled. The trip took six months into the fall of the year. They traveled the Old Oregon Trail and took the Barlow Cut-off around Mt. Hood. They first settled near Oregon City on the Willamette River and moved to Marion County near Sublimity in 1853 where Captain Evans took a 320 acre donation claim. He lived on this claim till his death in 1869.

T. H. Evans is listed in the 1860 Census of Marion County, Oregon, his age is 52, farmer, born in KY, it gives dwelling/family #353-2912, also listed is: N. Evans, 49, F, born KY; M. C. Evans, 15, F, born MO; R. Smith, 12, M, born MO.

Thomas married Nancy Donaldson on Jan 1, 1830 in Lafayette County, MO. The marriage was performed by Rev. Hugh R. Smith and witnessed and consented to by Nancy's mother. This is recorded in Bk B, Pg 3 of the county records. They were supposed to have been in MO in 1839 and purchased a homestead in 1843.

He was a Mason & is buried with his wife at ROCKY HILL CEMETERY on Waldo Hill, northwest of Almsville. The tombstone has a Masonic insignia. This cemetery is also known as the "Anderson Lone Fir Cemetery".

His will was filed with Marion Co, OR as probate file #352. Will dated Dec 22, 1868. Executors: George S. Downing & James Cooper, 4 FEB 1869. Heirs: Seny Ann Cooper, 37, Benton Co (Husband James Cooper); Rebecca I. Kinder, 34, Benton Co, (husband F. P. Kinder); Sarah Jane Brown, 32, Benton Co (husband - James D. Brown); Missouri A. Downing, dec'd; Mary C. Downing, 23, Marion Co, (husband George S. Downing); Mary A. Smith, 6, Marion Co, (George S. Downing & James Cooper to care for her share); Robert S. Shacleford, 19, Benton Co (James Cooper to care for his share); Heirs of Missouri A. Downing, dec'd: William H. Downing, 10; Iantha L. Downing, 8; Robert E. Downing, 4; all of Marion Co. (George S. Downing, father, Gdn of heirs). 
Evans, Thomas H (I1483)
 
193 According to Stewart's history of the Camerons, Mary Cameron, daughter of Alexander of Glen Nevis married James Cameron of Callart (P.179 & 196) Cameron, Mary (I980)
 
194 Adam Campbell and wife Elizabeth settled on a 300 acre tract of land on the South side of Hunting Creek near the Wilkes and Surry County line, in Rowan County, sometime prior to 1775. The Campbell Cemetery is located on this tract and is a historical landmark in the area. Campbell, Percival Adam (I3857)
 
195 After checking out the Portrait and Biographical Record of Buchanan and Clinton Counties, Missouri on-line and reading the story about John K. Johnson, which mentions that he raised six orphans, I am convinced that John and Mary did not raise their future son-in-law Roger Lee, but instead his five children. Martha's obituary says she left five small children, and from the 1880 census, we know that the first three were William, Mary and John. I think it's pretty conclusive that the other two (younger) would have been Myra and Roger, especially since the Lee orphans, mentioned in the Biographical Record, are in order: William H. Lee, Mary Maud Lee, John J. Lee, Myra E. Lee and Roger S. Lee.

Source: Monica Eshelman 
Johnson, Martha Ann (I4045)
 
196 After the WWI Elbert bought a car. It is the one he and Berty are in after their Wedding, pictured here Rice, Elbert Floyd Sr (I3743)
 
197 After their marriage they lived in Glenmoriston Scotland Cameron, John (Of Clunes) (I1072)
 
198 AKA Vasco U. Hack

"Our youngest brother, Ted, was born while Papa was still in college. He was christened Vasco Vane by Pop's youngest sister, Dixie, who had been reading a romantic novel— hero Vasco Vane. Thank Goodness the records had been lost when Ted came back for his birth certificate. We called him Teddy when he was born. "Teddy" Theodore Roosevelt was president then— every child wanted a Teddy bear and we got a real live brother instead. In his army records, etc. his name, (legal) is Ted Hack." Sourece: Irene Hack 
Hack, Theodore Vascovain (I1676)
 
199 Aldrovane Hayes, b. ca 1520 possibly
France. He was with the garrision in Calais France which was part of
England at the time. He was killed in a duel with the Duke of Cumberland.
When he died (1589) he left four sons.

He is the G-G-G-G Grandfather of Henry Hayes Sr., b. 1755-60, d. 1805
Hunting Creek, Wilkes Co., NC. m. ca 1774 Kizziah b. ca 1758-60, d. 1845
Hancock Co., IN.

Linda Spivey-Bjorklund
Baker City, Oregon 
Hayes, Aldrovane (I4394)
 
200 Alexander MACSORLIE-CAMERON of Glennevis 12th of Glen Nevis (MacSorlie). Imprisoned for a year after Culloden. Glen Nevis House was burned down by Cumberland's troops, and his wife and children sheltered in 'Somerled's Cave'. Brother Allan was killed at Culloden after raising a company in Glen Nevis. Alexander's wife was Mary, daughter of Archibald Cameron of Dungallon, by his wife Isobel, daughter of Sir Ewen Dubh Cameron of Lochiel.
..."On the 6th May [1749?] John Cameron of Fassfern, brother to the late Lochiel, Alexander Cameron of Gleneavies and Charles Stewart writer in Banavie were brought to Edinburgh by a party of soldiers from Fort William, and committed to the castle - liberated on bail 3 July" 
Cameron, Alexander 12th Chief of Glen Nevis (I4469)
 

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