Ramage Family History

Notes


Matches 201 to 250 of 1,386

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 28» Next»

   Notes   Linked to 
201 ALICE CARPENTER SOUTHWORTH BRADFORD
Alice Carpenter and her sisters (Agnes, Juliana, Mary and Priscilla) were part of the Leiden Separatist community. Alice married Edward Southworth; they had two sons, Constant and Thomas.After Edward Southworth died, Alice Carpenter Southworth sailed to Plymouth on the Anne in 1623. Shortly after her arrival, she married Plymouth Governor William Bradford.
The marriage of William Bradford and Alice Carpenter Southworth was noted in a letter written by Emmanuel Altham to his brother Sir Edward Altham in September, 1623 :"Upon the occasion of the Governor's marriage, since I came, Massasoit was sent for to the wedding, where came with him his wife, the queen, although he hath five wives. With him came four other kings and about six score men with their bows and arrows - where, when they came to our town, we saluted them with the shooting off of many muskets and training our men. And so all the bows and arrows was brought into the Governor's house, and he brought the Governor three or four bucks and a turkey. And so we had very good pastime in seeing them dance, which is in such manner, with such a noise that you would wonder..."And now to say somewhat of the great cheer we had at the Governor's marriage. We had about twelve pasty venisons, besides others, pieces of roasted venison and other such good cheer in such quantity that I could wish you some of our share. For here we have the best grapes that ever you say - and the biggest, and divers sorts of plums and nuts which our business will not suffer us to look for."Sidney V. James, Jr., editor, Three Visitors to Early Plymouth (Plymouth, Mass. : Plimoth Plantation, 1963), p. 29-30.
Constant and Thomas Southworth came to Plymouth sometime after 1627, they probably lived with their mother and stepfather. Alice and William Bradford had three children : William, Mercy and Joseph. William Bradford died in 1657, Alice died in 1670. Her death was noted in the Records of Plymouth Colony : "On the 26th day of March, 1670, Mistris Allice Bradford, Seni'r, changed this life for the better, haveing attained to fourscore years of age, or therabouts. She was a godly matron, and much loved while she lived, and lamented, tho aged, when shee died, and was honorabley entered on the 29th day of the month aforsaid, at New Plymouth. 
Carpenter, Alice (I4523)
 
202 Allan MACSORLIE-CAMERON of Glennevis 11th of Glen Nevis (MacSorlie). Baillie of Lordship of Lochaber. Only member of this family to have held a title for his lands from the time that his ancestor - Donald, son of Alexander, son of Somerled, was granted a Feu-Charter for Glen Nevis from George, 4th Earl of Huntly, in 1563. In this new charter, dated 1712, Allan is referred to as "the great-great-great-grandson of the said Donald MacAllister McSoirly". Allan was succeeded by his eldest son. Cameron, Allan MacSorlie (11Th Chief Of Glen Nevis) (I1043)
 
203 Alternate Birth & death dates in Hubbard , Marion County, Cemetary Records: "JONES, Joseph M. B: 1874 D: 04/06/1923 Plot: C 9 4 Husb of Harriet I. (Ramage) Jones (C-9-5). Father of Hattie (Jones) Fletcher (C-8-6a). Book 2/78, March 1, 1945, by Mrs. H. G. & Esther Jones, 20 ft., $20. Rec. 374, Book 3/33, June 22, 1960, by Harriet I. Jones, $25, P.C. "

From Gib Ramage Letter, "You asked for family History": "Aunt Belle married Joe Jones of the Brooks Joneses. He worked for the SP [Southern Pacific] Railroad and was killed when a train hit the "speeder" (a little four wheeled gas engine-powered cart that ran on the rails) he and some of the other men were on. " 
Jones, Joseph Madison (I1381)
 
204 Amelia KIRKENDALL. She was b. 18 Sept 1796 in SC, m. 1811-1816 to Benjamin GIST, d. 01 Apr 1862 in Moniteau Co. MO, bur. Moniteau Co. MO at the Mt. Moriah Baptist Church Cemetery.

The couple had located in Morgan Co. MO by 1823. They also resided later in Moniteau Co. MO.

Their known children were:
Julia Ann -born: c. 1817, mar. J. McPHERSON;
Mary E. -born: 1821, m. J.T. HOWARD;
Nancy E. -born: 1823, m. M. MULKEY and J. UPTEGROVE;
Hester Ann -born: 1825, m. J.T. MULKEY;
Matilda -born: 1831, m. J. HESS;
Elizabeth A. -born: 1834, m. R.A. SNODGRASS;
William Jasper -born: 1835, m. E.E. SMILEY;
Jaley A. -born: 1838, m. W.R. NEAL.

Have more complete information on children. Husband Benjamin GIST was the son of John GIST and Hannah GERON.

Source: Dawn Bingaman in the Genforam at Kirkendall Family Genealogy Forum 
Kirkendall, Amelia (I2594)
 
205 American Genealogoy Biographical Index (AGBI)
Name: Henry Hayes
Birth Date: 1750
Birthplace: North Carolina
Volume: 76
Page Number: 30
Reference: Heads of fams. at the first U.S. census. NC. By U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington, 1908. (292p.):168 Roster of soldiers from N.C. in the Amer. Rev. Comp. By D.A.R. of NC. Durham, NC. 1932. (12,709p.):530 
Hayes, Henry (I3188)
 
206 Andrew Hunter, born 18 April 1797 (according to some sources and his tombstone) or 25 April 1797 (according to Registers of the Parish of Old Cumnock) probably at Little Auchengibbert, Old Cumnock Parish, Kyle District, Ayr County, Scotland, christened 30 April 1797 at Cumnock, Old Cumnock Parish, Kyle District, Ayr County, Scotland, died 8 October 1870 in The Hunter Settlement, specifically on Lot 22, Concession 6, Edwardsburgh Township, Grenville County, Ontario in consequence of three days' suffering with a malady designated or referred to by his personal physician only as "dooper" but elsewhere described or defined by family members as dropsy or senile debility (a term indicative of the physical effects of advanced age), buried at St. Andrew's Cemetery, Spencerville, Edwardsburgh Township, Grenville County, Ontario, who married in or about 1826 or 1827, Isabella Ramage.

About 1849 - 1850 this Andrew, an accomplished artisan and craftsman and a skilled stonemason by trade, erected the fine stone residence which he called "Edinburgh Castle" and which, despite modernisation to a degree, was still standing in much the same essential form nearly a century and a half later, being then yet in the Hunter name and occupied by his great-grandson Dean and family until finally sold in 1996. This old family home had seen many changes and witnessed many dramas, particularly in times of crises and epidemics, such as the great diphtheria outbreaks of 1880 and 1885 which tragically claimed a total of three Hunter babies in this house. It was on the formermost occasion, with the death of young Rebecca, and the entire family in quarantine, that her grieving father John personally had to crudely hammer together a rough wooden casket and pass it through a window of Edinburgh Castle to the neighbouring men waiting outside, for a hasty interment in her grandfather Andrew's plot at St. Andrew's, Spencerville. 
Hunter, Andrew Jr (I2505)
 
207 Andrew Main began military service on 22 May 1847 at Alton, Madison County, Illinois, He served in the Mexican War. He mustered in as a sergeant in Company K, 1st Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He ended military service on 13 October 1848 at Alton, Madison County, Illinois.  Main, Andrew (I4475)
 
208 Andrew Nye was born June 6, 1750 in BUcks County, PA (now "Forks of the Delaware" Easton, Northampton Co., PA). He and Rachel McDonald are parents to two daughters, Nancy & Suzannah, both married men of the Main Family.
------------------------------
The record of Andrew's military service during the Revolution is fragmented. On May 23m 1780. the Yohogania County court "Ordered that Thos. Rigdon, Lieut. Andw. Nigh, proper person, as lieuts. of Militia." After this commission as lieutenant, nothing is recorded until 1782, when Andrew appears as a private in Capt. William Bruce's company in the second battalion of the Washington County, PA. Militia. Bruce was made captain in the Yohogania County militia the same day Andrew was made lieutenant.
--------------------------
From the New Castle News 2/15/1994
"Andrew Nye was born Jan. 6, 1750, and came with his family from Washington County, Pa., in 1793 to settle at the present site of Ellwood City. Nye had crossed the mountains to western Pennsylvania in 1776 by horseback, accompanied by his first wife and baby daughter, Sarah, who had been born Aug. 31, 1775. They had three children before his wife died.
He then married Rachel McDonald and they had three sons, Andrew, Thomas, and John, who were prominent in the pioneer days of Wayne Township. They had a total of 12 children and most were born before there were any white neighbors in the vicinity.
William McChesney of McChesney Road, New Galilee, provided the following information:
The Nye Family had the Runyans and Hazens for neighbors and across the Connoquenessing lived the Isaac Cole family. (In the Durant's history map it is spelled Conequenessing.)
Many stories have come down through the years to give us a picture of the lives of these early settlers and Granny Nye (nee Rachel McDonald) is the subject of several.
It is difficult to imagine wolves howling about the area that is now Pittsburgh Circle, Ellwood City, but it was on that spot that Granny Nye shot many of them after luring them within shooting distance by placing bits of food or bacon rind near the cabin.
In those days people had many superstitious ideas about the nature and cure for various diseases. Granny Nye had a black cat, which was believed to have mystic powers, and the blood from its tail was a sure cure for shingles. The cure was to cut off a small piece of the appendage and rub it on the affected part. It is said that people came from long distances for this magic cure, and though the cat lived to a ripe old age before it died, its tail had almost entirely disappeared.
In the Nye family are relics which bear out another ancient superstition. The cabinetmakers of that day often employed hinges made in the form of the letter H or the letter L which were supposed to prevent evil influences from passing through the door. The letter H stood for Holiness and the L for Lord.
A witch story, which comes down through the Runyan family, tells of the belief that certain women in the early days had the power of casting spells. One such amused herself by putting spells on the hand churns of her neighbors so that churn as hard as they could, no butter formed in the churn. One housewife stubbornly set herself against the spell, but after working all day at the churn no butter formed. Finally she heated a horseshoe in the stove and threw it in the churn. The story is that a cloud of smoke emerged and a huge black spider sprang out of the churn. This seemed to have the effect of removing the witch's power, for she was never able to cast this particular spell again.
It was believed that the only way to get even with a spell-caster was to make an image of her and shoot at it. Wherever the bullet struck the image an injury would develop in the body of the witch. The only cure for such injuries was to procure bandages from the person inflicting the injury.
On one occasion the local witch had put a spell on a neighboring family who was trying to get their apples harvested. Exasperated, a member of the family made an image and shot it in the arm. The witch, knowing upon whom she had cast the spell, was forced to beg linen from them with which to bind the cut in her arm. The family warned her that after this time they would never help her again."
-------------------- 
Nye, Andrew (I209)
 
209 Ann Fenn, bp. Holy Trinity, Coventry, co. Warwick, 25 July 1578. As his 2nd wife, she m. Thomas Potter, who served as mayor of Coventry in 1622. Her burial was recorded t Holy Trinity, Coventry, 12 July 1649, as 'Annis Potter wyfe of Mr Thom.' The fact that she is wife rather than widow indicates that her husband was then still alive. This couple is ancestral to the New England Needham family." Fenn, Ann (I4443)
 
210 Ann Putnam Jr. was the eldest child of Thomas and Ann Putnam. She was born in 1680. Ann was intelligent, well educated, and had a quick wit. At the time of the outbreak of witchcraft accusations, Ann was 12 years old. She was a close friend of several of the other afflicted girls. Mercy Lewis, 17, was a servant in the Putnam house, and Mary Walcott, 17, who was also afflicted, was perhaps Ann's best friend. Ann, Mary, and Mercy were among the first villagers outside of the Parris household to be afflicted.

Ann and six other young girls had listened as Tituba, Parris's Indian servant woman, told tales of voodoo and other supernatural events in her native Barbados. The girls also engaged in fortune telling--concerning, for example, matters such as what trade their sweethearts might have. During one fortune telling episode, Ann reported seeing a specter in the likeness of a coffin. After this incident, Ann, Betty Parris, and Abigail Williams (the niece and home resident of Parris) began to display strange symptoms. They complained of pain, would speak in gibberish, became contorted into strange positions, and would crawl under chairs and tables.

After Betty Parris was sent away, Ann and Abigail became the most active--as well as the youngest--of the accusers. Ann claimed to have been afflicted by sixty-two people. She testified against several in court and offered many affidavits. Her father, Thomas Putnam, was the chief filer of complaints in the village, and maintained complete control over the actions of the two afflicted girls living in his house. Most of the afflicted and the accusers were in some way related to the Putnam family. Ann Putnam Sr., Ann's mother, would also become afflicted at times, and was in court almost as much as her daughter and servant. The mother and daughter Ann were a particularly formidable pair of actors. People from miles around trooped into the courtroom to watch their performances.

In 1706, Ann offered a public apology for her participation in the witch trials at Salem. She stood in church while her apology was read: "I desire to be humbled before God. It was a great delusion of Satan that deceived me in that sad time. I did not do it out of anger, malice, or ill-will." Ann was the only one of the afflicted girls to make such an apology. There is some speculation that Ann was as much a victim as those she accused. She may have been manipulated by her parents and elders to achieve their ends.

In 1699, both of Ann's parents died within two weeks of each other. Ann, 19, was left to raise her nine orphaned brothers and sisters, ranging in age from 7 months to 18 years. Ann never married. She devoted her life to raising her siblings. She died in 1716 at the age of 37.
Source: University of Missouri at Kansas City Law School 
Putnam, Ann (I4604)
 
211 Anthony lived in Winster, Derbyshire, England and was buried in the All Saints Church graveyard in Youlgreave, a nearby city. American descendants visited the spot in 1904, and there was a headstone there.
Although we were able to obtain a copy of Anthony's will and inventory of his belongings from the Lichfield, England Office in 2002, they said there is no record of his burial place, and no longer a stone in the Cemetery, however they stated that many stones had been ruined and reduced to rubble over the years. 
Needham, Anthony (I4438)
 
212 Anthony removed from Salem to Brimfield, Massachusetts, and was the first white settler in the town. He was the first town clerk, selectman and representative to the general court from Brimfield from 1730 to 1740. He had numerous land grants in Brimfield, and was a leader in the pioneer work of clearing the wilderness and building up a prosperous community. When a body of municipal officers was organized in 1762 by the authorities of the district of South Brimfield he was elected to one of the leading positions. He took much interest in military affairs and became captain of a troop of horse. Wales, Massachusetts, was a part of Brimfield, Massachusetts, from 1731 till 1828, and a small moss-covered stone erected in his memory in the old burying ground in Wales, bearing the most ancient date of any stone there

The stone says: In Memory of Mr Anthony Needham who died July 2 1763 in the 67th year of his age 
Needham, Anthony (I4429)
 
213 At age 3 his parents moved to Hendricks Co., Indiana, where they remained until 1841, when they took up residence in Platte Co.,Missouri. There he married Sena on 1/13/1850 and they stayed until the spring of 1852. He then, with his wife and 1 child, started to cross the plains to Oregon. After 6 months they arrived in Clackamas Co., OR on 9/20/1852.

They moved to Waldo Hills, Marion Co., OR. In the summer of 1854 he moved to Benton Co., OR, locating a claim in King's Valley on which they lived 4 years. They then moved close to Philomath. In 1866 they purchased a beautiful 320 acre farm in Benton County 2.5 miles west of Corvallis. They lived there past 1885.

Source: "The History of Benton County Oregon" (1885) pg 511. There is a lithograph of the Benton County farm in this book. 
Cooper, James Abraham (I1506)
 
214 At age 4, Hannah crossed the plains with her parents apparently settling first in Eugene Oregon where her parents had a donation land claim, then moving to Jackson County where some of the children were born and returning later to Eugene. Her parents later moved to Rock Creek in Eastern Oregon, possibly after Hannah was married in 1867.

Grandmother had a dislocated hip which resulted from being thrown from the wagon when the ox team ran away. She walked with a pronounced limp, often using a home made crutch to give relief from pain.

Grandmother was very fond of her grandfather, Philip Mulkey who had a donation land claim located on what is now west 18th in Eugene. She was very proud of the orchard of apples and pears that he planted. She told of his generosity in giving fruit to new comers.

My sister, Georgia, moved to the E. A. McCornack home when she married his son, Rod, a Eugene veterinarian. The home was on West 18th near the Mulkey Cemetery in Eugene. Granddad McCornack had an acerage referred to as "87". Up on the hill was an orchard of apples and pears -- delicious but different from many of the modern varieties. One day when looking through the abstract for "87" he discovered that it was part of the original Philip Mulkey land claim. The fruit became even more delicious when we realized that our Great, great grandfather had planted the trees.

Quote by Gertrude Ramage in The Mulkeys of America, by Philip Mulkey Hunt

At least 2 of Hannah's sisters and their families, Martha Mulkey (Mrs. Lawson Cyrus) & Sarah Mulkey (Mrs WIlliam Rufus Marquiss) both lived on ranches in the Dayton area during this same time period. 
Mulkey, Hannah Gertrude (I3240)
 
215 At age eighteen, Joseph Putnam, our third-generation ancestor, came into his estate, which made him the second wealthiest man in Salem Village. Only Israel Porter, the oldest son of John Porter, exceeded him in the village. It is likely that Israel Porter continued in his advisory role to the neophyte. Joseph was easily absorbed into the Salem Town ranks of privilege and service. Over the years he served as Selectman on numerous occasions while being a part of the commercial life of other men of wealth and business. His greatest step in this ascent was his marriage to Israel Porter's oldest child, Elizabeth. He was 20 and she 16, which was unusually young for both at that time in Salem. The influence of Israel Porter was most certainly a factor. Joseph became part of an inter-family network, common within New England communities. Joseph continued to prosper and remained affluent throughout his life. Not so his half-brothers, who had to provide farms for their sons and diminish their personal wealth. They never forgot the "unfair" distribution of land by their father. They believed that their father, Thomas, Sr., had been manipulated by his second wife, Mary Veren Putnam, to unduly benefit his late-born son, Joseph. They were very likely correct in this belief-Israel Porter wrote the will, and with a shaky hand, Thomas Putnam, Sr. signed it and then died.
Witches
In the early months of 1692, witches were discovered in Salem Village. The genesis of the mania is believed to lie in the discontent of many villagers, particularly some of the Putnams, who felt that they were losing place in the world they knew. The first to be tortured by agents of the devil was the family of Thomas Putnam, Jr., whose daughter Ann was one of several teen-age girls who were afflicted. They screamed in pain induced by spectral torturers. Ann's father, Thomas Putnam, Jr., testified against 12 persons and filed complaints against 24. Daughter Ann testified against at least 21 persons and was the most infamous of the band of "afflicted girls". Others of the extended Thomas Putnam, Jr. family and that of his brother Nathaniel denounced and testified against village people. Ann Sr., Thomas' wife, was afflicted and had relief of her terrible headaches only after a woman she denounced, Rebecca Nourse, was arrested and in jail. Only Joseph, of all the Putnams, dared to speak out against the hysteria. Family lore has it that he kept a horse ready and saddled, as he was determined not to be taken had he been denounced. In accounts of that awful time, Joseph was called "the good Putnam".
As the hysteria spread, witches were discovered, denounced, and arrested throughout the villages and communities adjacent to Salem. The Salem court of jurisdiction consulted clergy and physicians. But as there were no objective tests for the accused, testimony was the only "evidence". Nineteen of the poor souls were executed. Eighteen were hung and one man was pressed to death in the hope that he would admit to witchery and save himself before the stones placed on him crushed the life from his body. 10
The General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, in Boston, had been alarmed at the events in the Salem jurisdiction, which over the first six months of 1692 had seen hundreds of denunciations and arrests. The trials and executions began in June and continued into September. Witchcraft was part of the ecclesiastic and common belief and was usually dealt with by trial and execution of the afflicting person-who was usually of the lower ranks and with some characteristic that made the person offensive.
The Bay Colony General Court in Boston disliked intervening in local affairs, but the numerous executions and the continuing denunciations forced it to act. The General Court convened in Salem in September, and after discussion with Salem clergy and officials, more than a hundred citizens were released from jail and all trials ceased. The great horror was over. Shame, guilt, and remorse pervaded the rest of the lives of most of those who had been deluded. There were exceptions. Ann Putnam, the wife of Thomas, Jr., whose denunciation of Rebecca Nourse (who had spectrally caused her great pain) led to Rebecca's trial and hanging, is not recorded among the remorseful. Her daughter, Ann, however, when the hysteria abated and she realized the suffering and death of innocents her testimony had brought to her neighbors, publicly begged forgiveness of her church and her community. by Charles Somerby Putnam, Jr. 
Putnam, Joseph (I3033)
 
216 At one time a Reeve of Finch Township and auditor of the township Cameron, Donald (I991)
 
217 Attention descendants of John Cameron of Clunes and Mary Cameron of Glennevis of Lot 6 Concession 4 Cornwall Twp, ON.

The purpose of this posting is to point out evidence establishing the age of Alexander Cameron, son of John Clunes Cameron and Mary Glennevis Cameron of lot 6 concession 4 Cornwall TWP, ON and to correct misinformation about that couple's son, Allan, reported in a chart in Duncan Darby MacDonald's compilation on the Camerons of Cornwall.

Alexander Cameron of 6/4 Cornwall has been said by some to have been born in 1754, although no reference was ever cited to support that assertion. We now know that he was born in 1764 because he tells us that in Upper Canada Land Petition RG 1 L3, C 1651,1815/99/C1, 1/21. This 14 August 1815 petition is from Alexander Cameron of lot 6 concession 4 Cornwall, a Loyalist U. E., Ensign 1st Regiment Stormont Militia, was born in Inverness North Britain, aged 51, has resided in Province of Upper Canada 30 years and upwards. Asks to be granted lot 15 north side of 3rd Street in Town of Cornwall and is prepared to erect a dwelling on this lot. Petition was granted 19 February 1817 and was requested at Cornwall. This same Alexander was granted the east half of 6/4 (what is now Cornwall Twp) in 1785 at the same time his father, John Clunes Cameron was granted the west half. Alexander would have been 21 in 1785.

The only Allan Cameron represented on McNiff's 1786 map of what later became called Cornwall TWP is Allan Cameron on the east half of lot 7 concession 4 Cornwall. This is immediately adjacent and to the west of John Clunes Cameron. Presumably this is the son, Allan, of John and Mary Cameron. It makes sense that he was a year younger than Alexander to have been 21 by 1786 to have been granted land.

Duncan Darby MacDonald reported on a chart in his compilation that Allan Cameron, son of John and Mary of 6/4 Cornwall, settled in Finch TWP, ON, and married Ann McMillan 24 March 1808, he of Finch and she of Lancaster. The Rev. John Bethune did report this marriage, but this Allan Cameron was not the son of John and Mary. This Allan Cameron purchased 15/7 Finch from Ewen Cameron in 1812 and in 1813 purchased 9/6 Finch from John McMillan. 9/6 Finch was granted by the crown in 1806 to another Allan Cameron, late of Scammadale,Scotland, who sold it to John McMillan two years later. Allan Cameron and Ann McMillan had a son, Allan, born in Finch in 1813 according to Bethune. Subsequent children of this couple were born in Lochiel. Allan, as a Justice of the Peace, witnessed a document in Lochiel in 1825. He later moved to Cumberland, ON before moving to Templeton, QC in the 1840's. He was in Buckingham, QC in the 1860's-70. These movements are supported by a well documented paper trail containing his distinctive signature.

Allan Cameron of Cornwall and his wife, Mary, were reported by John Bethune in 1790 to have had a daughter, Mary. In 1804 Bethune recorded the 5 July marriage of Allan Cameron of Cornwall widower and Jane McDonell of Charlottenburgh. Allan Clunes Cameron must have been dead by the spring of 1815 because there is a 25 April 1815 petition of Ann Cameron (Cumming) daughter of the late Allan Cameron of Cornwall, U. E. Loyalist. The 1816 will of John McDonell of Charlottenburgh leaves 50 pounds to his sister, Jane, widow of Allan Cameron. (This same will includes a 50 pound bequest to John's and Jane's sister, Janet Cameron, widow of Donald Cameron. This Donald was Allan Clunes Cameron's brother who died in Berwick,Finch in the spring of 1812 from injuries sustained in a log jam accident). It does not appear that Allan Clunes Cameron ever left Cornwall.

A male line descendant of Allan Cameron/Ann McMillan who at one time owned 9/6 Finch has recently had a DNA study and has no match with that of male line descendants of John Clunes Cameron of 6/4 Cornwall, including one whose family still owns the original grant at the west half of 6/4 Cornwall. This is proof that Duncan Darby MacDonald was mistaken in his conclusion that a son, Allan, of John and Mary Cameron, had moved to Finch and had married Ann McMillan of Lancaster.

Price Cameron
March 03, 2011
 
Cameron, John (Of Clunes) (I1072)
 
218 Aunt Sadie had no children of her own, but raised a stepson, (Harold Fletcher) for her husband whose name was Fletcher, I don't know his first name [Emerson FLETCHER- msr]. Source: Gib Ramage's letter - "You asked for family history"

--------------------------
Home in 1910: Walla Walla Ward 3, Walla Walla, Washington per 1910 census:


Name: Sadie Fletcher
Age in 1910: 35
Birth Year: 1875
Birthplace: Minnesota
Home in 1910: Walla Walla Ward 3, Walla Walla, Washington
Race: White
Gender: Female
Relation to Head of House: Wife
Marital Status: Married
Spouse's Name: S Emerson Fletcher
Father's Birthplace: Canada English
[Canada]
Mother's Birthplace: England

Household Members:
Name Age
S Emerson Fletcher 56
Sadie Fletcher 35
George Fletcher 16
Will Fletcher 14
Thomas Fletcher 10
---------------------------------
Home in 1920: San Diego, San Diego, California per 1920 Census

Name: Emerson S Fletcher
Age: 67
Birth Year: abt 1853
Birthplace: Iowa
Home in 1920: San Diego, San Diego, California
Race: White
Gender: Male
Relation to Head of House: Head
Marital Status: Married
Father's Birthplace: Massachusetts
Mother's Birthplace: Massachusetts
Home Owned: Rent
Able to Read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes

Household Members:
Name Age
Emerson S Fletcher 67
Sadie Fletcher 45
Harold Fletcher 14
-------------------------------
Home in 1930: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon per 1930 census
Name: Emmerson Fletcher
[Ermmerson Fletcher]
Gender: Male
Birth Year: abt 1854
Birthplace: United States

Race: White
Home in 1930: Portland, Multnomah, Oregon

Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Spouse's Name: Sadie Fletcher
Father's Birthplace: United States
Mother's Birthplace: United States

Household Members:
Name Age
Emmerson Fletcher 76
Sadie Fletcher 56
Harold H Fletcher 25
 
Ramage, Sarah "Sadie" E (I1386)
 
219 Became the 13th chief of Camerons (Lochiel) in 1528

From: Duncan Hartley of www.cameron-site.com: 1st of Lochiel. Also known as Ewen Allanson. He was beheaded in 1546, after a long and stormy life, for his support of the Earl of Lennox's revolt and his part in the the Battle of Blar na leine ('Battle of the shirts') at the head of Loch Lochy. His first wife was daughter of Celestine MacDonald of Lochalsh. Second wife was daughter of Lachlan Macintosh, and sister of William, 13th chief of Macintosh.

Battle of Flodden: Honoring his agreement with King Louis XII of France to divert English troops who were required in France to fight for Henry VIII, King James IV of Scotland crossed into England, with the battle of Flodden (Hill) taking place at Branxton, Northumberland (the northernmost county of England, near what is now Berwick and Tweed) on September 9th 1513.

The Scots numbered about 30,000 men supported by artillery, including approximately 5000 French troops, sent to Scotland to assist. Among these Scottish troops was a contingent of Camerons, led by Ewen MacAllan Cameron, XIII Captain and Chief of Clan Cameron. Ewen is said to have been in "great favor" with James IV, consequently he loyally supported the King in all his wars (although besides Flodden, it is not know which battles the Camerons specifically fought in). The Scots were opposed by Henry's lieutenant in the north, Thomas Howard, Earl of Surrey. Howard gathered an English force of about 20,000; some archers and some armed with long staffs that had a blade shaped like a hook at the end.

Though they were outnumbered, the English were better equipped and by nightfall had won a major victory. Anywhere from 10,000 - 12,000 Scots, including King James IV, were killed. Included in the casualties were the son of the Archbishop of St. Andrews; two bishops; ten abbotts; twelve Earls; fifteen Lords; fifteen Knights; twenty-five gentlemen heads of families of note; and sons and sires of every good family in the land. Scarcely a Scottish community was spared. It was a grand battle, marked with bravery and valour on both sides, and Ewen Cameron of Lochiel was fortunate enough to escape with his life, as were a portion of his Cameron troops. 
Cameron, Ewan (Macallan)(13Th Chief Of Lochiel) (I825)
 
220 believed to be the daughter of John Hurd Hurd, Mercy (I3847)
 
221 Betty reported that Ed and Bertha were in a fatal auto accident. Pike, Miner Edson (I194)
 
222 Between 1979 and 1991, I was in the Marine Corps. During WW1, the Germans gave us the nick-name "devildog" refering to how they fought at the battle of Belleau Wood in France. That explains the e-mail address. Freeman, Larry V (Bott) (I2489)
 
223 Beverley Joy Rice Dalton Beverley Joy Rice Dalton, 84, completed a splendid life on March 19, 2005, surrounded by her family. Beverley was born October 5, 1920, in Jerome, Idaho, to Elbert and Alberta Patrick Rice. She spent her childhood in Jerome as one of four children in a loving home. As the oldest child, she learned compassion and duty as she helped care for her invalid mother, which served her well through 84 years of service and loving care for others. She married her high school sweetheart, James Cecil Dalton, on January 30, 1939, and they were blessed with five children. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Oakland LDS Temple. She served in many church callings, particularly as an accomplished musician. Her talent for piano, organ, and voice, enriched the lives of numerous people as she was an excellent accompanist and soloist. She served in the Relief Society and was a legendary meetinghouse librarian. She had a talent for friendship, cooking, and needlework, and had a great love of books and good music. These gifts were used for the benefit of others, and that legacy remains with her family. Beverley possessed a firm testimony of the gospel of Jesus Christ and rejoices today with family and friends in a heavenly reunion. Beverley is survived by her children: Michael (Dena), TX; Gregory (Dlora), Taylorsville; Bradley (Sherrie), VA; and Shannon (Ron) Laudie, Pleasant Grove. Additional survivors include 22 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband; son, James; step-mother, Marvel Rice; siblings: Elbert, Donald, and Phyllis; and granddaughter, Amy Laudie. The family thanks the staff at the Provo Dialysis Center who have loved and cared for Beverley during her many years of dialysis. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, March 23, 2005, at 11 a.m., in the Edgemont 19th Ward Chapel, 300 W. 4800 North, Provo. Friends may call Tuesday evening, 6-8 p.m., at the Walker Sanderson Funeral Home, 646 E, 800 North, Orem; and, at the church, Wednesday, one hour prior to services. Interment, Orem City Cemetery. Directors, Olpin Family Mortuary, Pleasant Grove. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.olpinfamilymortuary.com
Published in the Daily Herald on 3/21/2005. 
Rice, Beverley Joy (I3745)
 
224 Birth C. 1865 Sharer, Lucy J (I2350)
 
225 Birth date: C. 1660

He was trained as a Physician and Surgeon in France.


Death date: C. 1728 THIS INFORMATION OBTAINED FROM "THE CHASTAIN FAMILY TREE IN A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE HUGUENOTS" BY JAMES GARVIN CHASTAIN D.D., SHAW, MISS. COMPILED BY NORA YOUNG FERGUSON JULY 20, 1953

The year was 1659 when Pierre Chastain was born in the ancient Province of Berry, in or near the village of Charost, which is almost the geographic center of France. Pierre Chastain was the son of Estienne Chastain and Jeanne Laurent. Pierre's father, Estienne and his grandfather, Jacques Chastain, had both served as notaire royal at Charost. Estienne was born circa 1625, the son of Jacques and Jeanne Audet Chastain. It is thought that Jacques, born circa 1598-1600, was either the son or grandson of the Estienne Chastain who fled the city of Bourges at the time of the Massacre of St. Bartholomew's Day in 1572. Proof of Pierre's first wife comes from the registers of Vevey in cantonal archives in Lausanne, Switzerland. This proof also corrects the assumption that Magdalaine de la Rochefaucald was Pierre's first wife. Pierre Chastain married Susanne Reynaud, daughter of Pierre Reynaud, from the village of Issoudun. By 1696, the Pierre Chastain family had fled from Charost across the Jura Mountains to Vevey, Canton Vaud, Switzerland to escape religious persecution. Sometime after September 1698, the family departed Vevey and was found at The Haque in The Netherlands (Holland). From there, the family moved to London, England where they remained a short time while Pierre became active in gathering together a group of French Huguenot refugees for colonization in Virginia. Pierre Chastain, his wife Susanne Reynaud Chastain and five children were among the group of 207 passengers who embarked from Gravesend, England on April 19, 1700 aboard the ship Mary and Ann of London. This ship arrived at the mouth of the James River on July 12, 1700. The group settled in Manakin, Virginia about twenty miles up the James River. The group was given a 10,000 acre tract of land south of the James in an area once occupied by the Monacan Tribe of Indians.
Pierre's wife, Susanne, died after February 1701 and before November 1701, two of the children also had died. Pierre then married Anne Soblet. Ann was the daughter of Abraham Soblet and Susanne Brian. The marriage to Anne Soblet produced eight children. Anne Soblet Chastain died on April 3, 1723. Pierre married a third time to Mary Magdaline (Verrueil) Trabue, daughter of Moise and Madelene Verrueil and widow of Antoine Trabue. Pierre Chastain died in Goochland County, Virginia in the fall of 1728. He had made his will on October 3, 1728 and this will was probated on November 20, 1728. He was buried in the family cemetery near his home. Magdeline Chastain died in late Spring of 1731, she and Pierre did not have children.
The family cemetery where Pierre Chastain was buried is located near Manakin Episcopal church. The Cemetery was located a few yards from the family home and contained several field stones and as many as 30 graves. A brick wall surrounding the family plot was torn down in 1929 by a farmer who used the bricks to build a house. (from the Pierre Chastain Assoc.)

In his will of Oct 03, 1728 he gave land to his wife Magdalene and to his sons:
John Peter, and Rene. a tract of 574 acres lying on the lower Manakin Creek. 
Chastain, Dr. Pierre (I229)
 
226 Birth date: 1885

541-44-3127 
Hayes, Grover Cleveland (I3248)
 
227 Birth date: C. 1692

Mildred Archer Chastain was the wife of Peter Chastain, Jr. Peters father, Pierre(Peter) Chastain(Chastaing) willed Peter Chastain, his son and Heirs one hundred and eleven acres of land on the 3rd day of October, 1728. At a Court continued and held for Goochland Countyon the 20th day of November, 1728 - this will was proved by the oaths of Thomas Randolph and Daniel Guerrent Jr. and was admitted to record. HENRY WOOD CLCUR. County of Goochland and Parish of King William. 
Chastain, Pierre Jr (I2293)
 
228 Birth place on 1880 census for son Delos(s) Young who states his father & mother were both born in MA

"Rensellier" Young, age 40, shoemaker, was listed in the 1850 census in Holland, Hampden, MA. He was staying at a tavern run by Elisha Kinney (innkeeper).

In 1860, he was listed as "Renseler" in Union, Tolland, CT, age 58, day laborer, living on Nathaniel Newell's farm. (Albert Slade, shoemaker, lived next door).

Both census records list CT as his birthplace.

1860 Wisconsin Census states that he ran away from the family, see notes for Julia

I would guess that Rensselaer "ran away" in late 1849 or early 1850; that is, after Susan was engendered, but before 6 September 1850, when the census was taken in Holland, MA. 
Young, Rensselaer (I3668)
 
229 Birth Place: NATIVE OF WHITE COUNTY, ILL Benton, Georgia A (I1257)
 
230 Birth place: OHIO,OLD LOGAN OR WARREN CO., KY

Birth source: PAGE 503, PIONEER FAMILIES OF BUTLER COUNTY BY AUSTIN AND ROUK 
Doolan, Hardin (I1221)
 
231 Birth place: PRINCE WILLIAM CO, VA

Birth source: born in 1736, GOOCHLAND CO., VA

1ST LIEUTENANT, REF. BY HISTORY OF VIRGINIA IN REVOLUTION BY JOHN H GWALTHNET, 1938. REVOLUTION WAR VETERAN

Death source: INDEX OF WILLS FROM 1754-1830 OF BEDFORD CO., VA EDITED BY ROWLAND BUFORD "WILLIAM HUDNALL, TESTATOR, FEB. 22, 1813; DATE OF PROBATE OF WILL" BOWLING GREEN, KY LIBRARY BOOK (DEATH DATE IS BETWEEN THESE DATES LISTED

Marriage source: DOUGLAS REGISTER BY WM. DOUGLAS FROM 1750-1797 (PARISH REGISTER OF GOOCHLAND CO., DOVER CHURCH MARRIAGES LISTS: WM. HUDNEL AND FRANCES SMITH, BOTH OF THIS PARISH DEC. 15, 1757, PAGE 3 PAGE 27

Last Will and Testament of William Hudnall, Sr. b. 1732 d. 1813 In the name of God Amen; The Thirty first day of January in the year of our Lord 1813, and the Commonwealth of Virginia the 37th. I, William Hudnall Sr., of the State of Virginia and county of Bedford, being sick and weak in body... In the first place I constitute and make and ordain my only and sole executors of this my last will and testament, John Hudnall and David Saunders, Sr. I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Frances _____ and at her decease to be sold on credit of 12 months which is to be divided among Susannah Wright, John Hudnall, Mary Hylton, Joanna St. Clair, Thomas S. Hudnall, William Hudnall, Richard Hudnall and Nancy Hurt wife of William O. Hurt or their heirs... I give and bequeath to my beloved son Richard Hudnall or his heirs exclusive of an equal division with the above name legatees. I also give and bequeath to Quintilla Thurmon, wife of Henry Thurmon 10 pounds current money or to her heirs my estate to equally divided among the above name legatees vis; Susannah Wright.... Signed sealed and delivered in presence of teste- George Nowell, Jr., Moses Fuqua and Jacob Dawson. Proved and filed , February 22, 1813. Other Sources: Quaker Genealogy, p. 937 DAR #0557504 Parish Register of Goochland County; St. James Parish, p. 218 Our Kin by Mary D. Ackerly. 1930. History of Virginia in Revolution by John H. Gwalthnet, 1938 Root Cellar #2, submitter #31778 (Everton Publishers) Index of Wills From 1754-1830 of Bedford Co., Va edited by Rowland Buford: Pioneer Families of Missouri "William Hudnall, Testator, Feb. 22, 1813; date of probate of will"; [WKU Library book] Group sheet from Jean Bacus Douglas Reg., Vol. 3, pp. 323 Nora T Young's group sheets Dar Library, Vol. 1, page 69, Miscellaneous Wills Volume 1, DAR Library, p. 69, Will Book D p. 81, Bedford County, Virginia FANNIE: On February 2, 1815 there is a marriage between Fanny McGeorge and Hezekiah Dickerson recorded in county of Bedford and listed on Automated Archives CD229 Marriage records-Southern States  
Hudnall, William Thomas (I423)
 
232 Birth source: HISTORY OF THE BAPTISTS OF VIRGINIA BY ROBT BAYLOR SEMPLE MENTIONS RENE CHASTAIN BORN IN POWHATTAN COUNTY, JUNE 28, 1741, PAGE 475

4/20/1772, Rev Ranne [Rene] Chastain a bred Anglican churchman, who embraced the
sentiments of Baptist in 1769, was ordained by Rev John Waller
Buckingham Co VA Source:Church & Marriage Records, p 38

Rene was a Virginia Baptist minister who took part in the organization of many Baptist churches. He was pastor at Buckingham for 53 years as well as at Cumberland, Providence, Mulberry Grove and other churches.

Rane (Rene?) Chastain of Buckingham Co, VA, owned property just south of Owingsville, Bath co, KY. In 1814 he divided this land among his children, Martin, Magdalena, Elijah, and Rhoda. The land straddles I-64, on Slate creek. 
Chastain, Rene (I679)
 
233 Birth source: BLUEGRASS ROOTS, WINTER 1980, VOL. VII, NO. 4, PAGE 117, STATES "BORN MARCH 4, 1851, DEATH MARCH 4, 1855" TAKEN FROM LISTING OF BURIALS IN MT. PISGAH CEMETERY

Death source:FROM JOHN W. HUDNALL'S BIBLE OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL AND HISTORY OF KY. ILLUS. 1886, BY BATTLE, PERRIN AND KNIFFIN

Burial place: MT PISGAH CEMETERY, WARREN CO., KY 
Hudnall, John Wesley Jr. (I1950)
 
234 Birth source: BLUEGRASS ROOTS, WINTER 1980, VOL. VII, NO. 4, PAGE 117, STATES: "JERRY HUDNALL BORN (NOV. 1, 1834) DIED (SEPT. 16, 1862) TAKEN FROM HEADSTONE AT CEM.

Death source:FROM JOHN W. HUDNALL'S BIBLE OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL AND HISTORY OF KY, ILLUS. 1886, BY BATTLE, PERRIN AND KNIFFIN

Burial place: MT PISGAH CEMETERY, WARREN CO., KY 
Hudnall, Jeremiah (I2066)
 
235 Birth source: FROM BIBLE OF JAMES T. HUDNALL OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL

Burial place: MT PISGAH CEMETERY, WARREN CO., KY 
Hudnall, Arthur Ray (I2006)
 
236 Birth source: FROM BIBLE OF JAMES T. HUDNALL OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL Hudnall, Jerry Ray (I1986)
 
237 Birth source: FROM BIBLE OF JAMES T. HUDNALL OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL AND DESCENDANT SHEET COMPILED BY KATHRYN SUE HUDNALL 12/14/1974

Burial place: SACREMENTO MEM. LAWN CEM., CAL. 
Hudnall, Carrie Belle (I2003)
 
238 Birth source: FROM BIBLE OF JAMES T. HUDNALL OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL AND DESCENDANT SHEET OF CHARLINE LYNCH, COMPILED BY KATHRYN SUE HUDNALL 2/17/1977

Burial place: OAK FOREST CEMETERY 
Hudnall, Bessie Rea (I2041)
 
239 Birth source: FROM HISTORY OF JOSEPH TAYLOR BY SHARI FRANKE, PAGE 196 Doolan, Eliza Jane (I1968)
 
240 Birth source: FROM JOHN W. HUDNALL'S BIBLE OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL AND HISTORY OF KY. ILLUS. 1886 BY BATTLE, PERRIN AND KNIFFIN

IN JOSEPH TAYLOR FAMILY HISTORY BY SHARI FRANKE SHE GIVES FIRST WIFE OF SHADRACK DAVENPORT'S SON (WILLIAM A) AS MARRYING RACHEL A HUDNALL. I'M NOT SURE IF THIS IS THE CORRECT WIFE BUT SHE STATES THEY WERE COUISINS. SHE DOES NOT LIST PARENTS OF RACHEL A HUDNALL 
Hudnall, Rachel A (I2203)
 
241 Birth source: FROM JOHN W. HUDNALL'S BIBLE OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL AND HISTORY OF KY. ILLUS. 1886, BY BATTLE, PERRIN AND KNIFFIN Hudnall, Harriet Tobitha (I1953)
 
242 Birth source: FROM JOHN W. HUDNALL'S BIBLE OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL AND HISTORY OF KY. ILLUS. 1886, BY BATTLE, PERRIN AND KNIFFIN Hudnall, Elijah Upton (I1954)
 
243 Birth source: FROM MRS ELIZABETH TIVIS OF INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI DESC. OF RENE CHASTAIN HUDNALL Hudnall, Elihu (I1923)
 
244 Birth source: FROM MRS ELIZABETH TIVIS OF INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI DESC. OF RENE CHASTAIN HUDNALL Hudnall, Josephine (I1906)
 
245 Birth source: FROM SHEETS OF SHARI FRANKE RESEARCHING TAYLOR ANCESTRY Hudnall, Irven (I1224)
 
246 Birth source: KY GENEALOGY AND BIOGRAPHY, PAGE 172 OF WARREN COUNTY HISTORY
1850 CENSUS OF WARREN COUNTY

Marriage source: MARRIAGE LISTED IN BOOK,WARREN COUNTY MARRIAGES 1797-1851, COPYRIGHT 1970, FROM ORIGINAL MARRIAGE BONDS. (SECURITY FROM ALLEN TAYLOR) 
Goode, Samuel Venable (I832)
 
247 Birth source: KY GENEALOGY AND BIOGRAPHY, VOL 2, PAGES 179-180. FROM JOHN W. HUDNALL'S BIBLE OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL AND HISTORY OF KY, ILLUSTRATED 1886, BY BATTLE, PERRIN AND KNIFFIN Hudnall, Caroline (I2064)
 
248 Birth source: KY GENEALOGY AND BIOGRAPHY, VOL. 2, PAGES 179-180 AND FROM BIBLE OF JAMES T. HUDNALL OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL.

Burial place: MT PISGAH CEMETERY, WARREN CO., KY 
Hudnall, Maude C (I2044)
 
249 Birth source: KY GENEALOGY AND BIOGRAPHY, VOL. 2, PAGES 179-180 AND FROM BIBLE OF JAMES T. HUDNALL OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL.

Burial place:MT PISGAH CEMETERY, WARREN CO., KY 
Hudnall, Eaven S (I2047)
 
250 Birth source: KY GENEALOGY AND BIOGRAPHY, VOL. 2, PAGES 179-180 AND FROM BIBLE OF JAMES T. HUDNALL OWNED BY GALE HUDNALL. Hudnall, John Wesley (I2046)
 

      «Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 28» Next»