Ramage Family History

Noah Webster, Jr

Noah Webster, Jr

Male 1758 - 1843  (84 years)

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  • Name Noah Webster, Jr 
    Suffix Jr 
    Born 16 Oct 1758  West Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 22 Oct 1758  West Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 2 May 1843  New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried 31 May 1843  Grove Street Cem, New Haven, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3497  Ramage | Young Lines
    Last Modified 28 Mar 2011 

    Father Noah Webster, Sr,   b. 20 Mar 1722, Hartford Twp., Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Nov 1813, West Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years) 
    Mother Mercy Steele,   b. 8 Oct 1727, West Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Oct 1794, Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years) 
    Married 12 Jan 1749  Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Noah, son of Daniel Webster & Mercy, daug of Eliphalet Steele - - - - - Jan 12, 1749
      From the records of the Congregational Church of West Hartford (organized in 1713)
    Family ID F1219  Group Sheet

    Family Rebecca Greenleaf,   b. 27 May 1766, Quincey, MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jun 1847, New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Married 26 Oct 1789  Boston, Suffolk, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Emily Scholten Webster,   b. 4 Aug 1790, Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Aug 1861  (Age 71 years)
    +2. Frances Juliana Webster,   b. 5 Feb 1793, Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Aug 1869, New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     3. Harriet Webster,   b. 6 Apr 1797, Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Mar 1844, Amherst, , Massachusetts Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 46 years)
     4. Mary Webster,   b. 7 Jan 1799, New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Feb 1819  (Age 20 years)
     5. William Greenleaf Webster,   b. 15 Sep 1801, New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Jan 1869, New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
     6. Eliza Steele Greenleaf Webster,   b. 21 Dec 1803, Hartford, Hartford, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Nov 1888, Bridgeport, Fairfield, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     7. Bradford Greenleaf Webster,   b. 20 Nov 1806, New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Nov 1806, New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     8. Louisa Greenleaf Webster,   b. 12 Apr 1808, New Haven, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 28 Mar 2011 
    Family ID F1215  Group Sheet

  • Photos


  • Notes 
    • Webster's New International Dictionary (G & C Merriam, 1950) states:

      Noah Webster, 16 Oct 1758 - 28 May 1843 - "The significance of Noah Webster's Dictionary and his Spelling Book can be appreciated only when they are viewed against the background spanned by his life. He was born on an eighty-acre Connecticut farm the year before Wolfe's victory on the Plain of Abraham, and lived to see American pioneers penetrate overland into California and Oregon. He was a small boy when the Stamp Act aroused the colonists, and a student at Yale when college classes were dispersed into the interior towns by the menace of British landing parties. He marched with his father against Burgoyne. IN 1785, moved by the incompetence of the thirteen Sovreign States, he wrote a widely circulated argument for national uniion. In 1787 he issued an influential pamphlet advocating the adoption of the Federal Constitution. From 1793 to 1798 he owned, managed and edited a daily and a weekly newspaper in New York City, supporting the Federalist policies of Washington and Adams. Living under the first ten presidents, he witnessed the acquisition of the Louisiana Territory and Florida, the admission of thirteen additional states and the approaching annexation of Texas. Out of his patriotism and nationalism inspired by this sweep of events came the conviction that lusty young America needed its own schoolbooks, its own uniform language, and its own intellectual life. Into the attainment of these ends Webster flung himself with insatiable curiosity and indomitable energy. His American Spelling Book (which taught not only spelling but pronunciation, common sense, morals, and good citizenship) was partly provoked by his efforts to use Dilworth's English Spelling Book while he was teaching school in Connecticut, New York, and Philadelphia. His dictionaries (Compendious 1806, American 1828) were suggested partly by his resentment against the ignorance concerning American institutions shown in contemporary British dictionaries. All his life he was a defender and interpreter of the American political "experiment," with all its cultural implications. His Dictionaries and his Spelling book grew out of an intimate and vital familiartity with American life. He knew the farm, the law, the city, the school, and politics. He knew the country as a whole - he had traveled (1785-1786) by horse, by carriage, and by sailing vessel from Massachusetts to South Carolina, persuading State legislatures to pass laws for the protection of copyright. He was a spelling reformer, an orchardist, a gardener, and an experimental scientist. He was admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court.
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      Noah's house is still standing in West Hartford, Conn. on the direct road, about one mile south of the church, which stands in the center of town. His grandfather was of the first settlers in Hartford and governor of Connecticut. His mother was a descendant of William Bradford, of Plymouth, Connecticut. He entered Yale in 1774 and he had been but a few months in college when the thrilling story or Lexington and Concord came, followed soon by Bunker Hill.
      General Washington and his staff passed through New Haven on his way to take command of the revolutionary force gathered in Cambridge. They lodged there, and in the morning were invited to see the drill of a company of the students, who finally escorted General Washington as far on his way as Neck Bridge. Webster had the honor of leading the way, blowing a fife. In the third year of his course, on account of the war, college life in New Haven was broken up, and the classes were dispersed in various towns. Webster's class went to Glastonbury, and on the alarm by the approach toward Connecticut of Burgoyne, accompanied by a large band of savage Indians, a company went from West Hartford, commanded by Deacon Webster, and in that company went his three sons, Noah among them. This company took part in the brilliant victories which ended in Burgoyne's surrender. The following year Noah finished his college course.